RACING TRANSPORTERS, SUPPORT VEHICLES AND OTHER TRUCKS PT. 2

The unsung heroes of many racing teams has been the support vehicles and transporters which haul gear, crew and cars to and from racing venues. They have been a simple as single axle open trailers towed behind old pickup trucks, to ulti-axle semi trailers which double as mobile workshops, crew quarters and lounges. Presented here is our collection ofthe vehicles that make the racing possible, listed by major teams/makes.

VARIOUS OTHER TEAMS, SUPPORT VEHICLES & CAR TRANSPORTERS


ALPINE RENAULT - ASTON MARTIN

1971 Saviem SG2: Built by Saviem from 1965 to 1980, the 3.0L diesel powered 3.5 Ton van was branded as a Renault to 1970 and then Saviem afterwords. Utilized by Alpine Renault as a service vehicle for the Alpine A110 rally team, including it 1971 and 1973 Monte Carlo wins.
Model by IXO 1/43
1971 Saviem SG2
Model by IXO
Saviem SG2
1957 Jaguar Mk VII: Mike Salmon used his big Jaguar saloon to tow his Aston Martin DB4GT Zagato to Le Mans in 1962. The 3.4L six-cylinder Jaguar would have been capable of hauling the Aston from England to France, just dont stop quickly!
Modle by OXFORD (modified) 1/43


ASTON MARTIN RACING - BENETTON F1

2011 MAN F2000: At Le Mans in 2011, Gulf Aston Martin Racing Middle East campaigned this V8 Vantage GT2 in the GTE Am class. After leading its class, its race was over after an accident early Sunday morning.
Model by NEWRAY (modified) 1/43
2018 RAM Promaster 2500: The RAM Promaster is a durable cargo van which offers a standard 3.6L V6 engine, capable of hauling a good sized load. I thought it would make a good race spares hauler and made this "what if" van in the livery of Aston Martin Racing.
Model by GREENLIGHT (modified) 1/43

1995 Renault AE 500 Magnum (Benneton F1): Produced from 1990-2013, the Magnum line of heavy trucks from Renault won the International Truck of the Year award in 1991. They featured a flat floored cab with separate engine compartment, which gave the driver more room and better comfort. This truck served the Benetton F1 team in 1995 as they switched from Ford to Renault power. Michael Schumacher won his second World Championship in 1995, repeating as Champion from 1994.
Model by Louis Surber 1/43


BMC

1955 Morris Van: To support their MGA effort at Le Mans in 1955, BMC had a specialized race support van constructed from a Morris 5-ton truck chassis (FV or FE). Designed as a transporter, mobile workshop, crew quarters and field kitchen, the van was used by BMC for several years, undergoing modifications along the way. When it was no longer of use, it was sold and apparently used as a chicken coop in Ireland. A reconstruction of the original van was made, but without detailed original plans or drawings, it was done from photos and by memory of those that drove and/or worked for BMC at the time.
Model by DINKY (modified) 1/43
1955 Morris Van: In 1955, the MGA's raced at Le Mans were driven to the track in caravan, with the van in close support. It carried the spares, tires and other equipment required for the race. During the race, in back it had fold down bunks on which the crew could try and get some rest. It also had a large boiler which kept water hot for tea at all times, as well as a single ring burner for heating soup. Before the race, the crew was stationed at a nearby hotel and the courtyard was used as a rudimentary paddock. As needed, a car could be driven onto the van on ramps and then backed onto elevated ramps to allow underside repairs and adjustments.
Model by DINKY (modified) 1/43
1955 Morris Van: Coming Soon! I am in the process of converting an old Dinky Horse Van into a replica of the BMC transporter used at Le Mans in 1955. The project is currently on my workbench and will be completed in the coming months. My friend Bill Emerson has provided me with decals and inspiration for this project.
Model by DINKY (modified) 1/43
1955 Morris Van: In the event of a complete breakdown during the race, a car could be loaded into the van for transport back to England from wherever the team was racing or rallying, as it did at Le Mans in 1955. Loaded with tools, spares, etc., the van had a top speed of 40 mph. It was driven by a 4.3L six-cylinder diesel engine producing 100 hp and had a top-speed of 40 mph. It's non-synchro 4-speed transmission, drum brakes and no power steering made the fully loaded truck a real bear to drive over the Alps! The transporter was used by the BMC Competition Department until about 1960, when it was replaced by a more modern transporter.
Model by Bill Emerson from DINKY (modified) 1/43

1955 Morris FVS12 BMC Race Support Van: The BMC Competition Department was formed in 1955 and its first manager, Marcus Chambers, commissioned Appleyard of Leeds to build a custom van body on a Morris EVS12 chassis. The new vehicle which was launched in time to support the MG effort at Le Mans in 1955, was designed as a mobile workshop, carrying spares, tools and tires for the BMC racing efforts. It could also be used if needed to haul a broken race or rally car home. The van saw several different configurations in its use primarily as a rally support vehicle, being used by BMC up to 1966.
Model by MATRIX 1/43
1955 Morris FVS12 BMC Race Support Van (1955 Le Mans): Powered by a Morris 5.1L six-cylinder petrol engine, the van had a four-speed transmission with two-speed rear axle. There was a bench seat which could accommodate three crew. Behind the crew was a small gally, mostly employed for making tea and heating soup. In the rear, there were fold down bunks which could be used for crew and/or drivers to rest during long events. Nostalgically remembered now, it wasn't always so. One BMC driver/mechanic commented, "It was an absolute sod to drive through the Alps", its length, power and top speed being limiting factors.
Model by MATRIX 1/43
1955 Morris FVS12 BMC Race Support Van (1955 Le Mans): Despite its limitations, the van was a major step up in accommodation and race/rally support at the time. While never designed to transport cars to events, having an array of tools and equipment to make repairs at far away events was a huge benefit. In good weather, a car could be driven up the ramps into the van and then backed onto ramps which formed an elevated work platform for working under the competition cars it was servicing. This famous photo shows one of the MGAs being serviced in the courtyard of the chateau the BMC team used as its base at Le Mans in 1955.
1955 Morris J Van: This is a smaller version of the large Morris van that BMC used to support the MG Team at Le Mans in 1955. Not designed to carry cars, it carried all the teams tools, spares, etc. and served as a mobile workshop.
Model by CORGI 1/50

1959 Morris LD150 Van: Introduced in 1954 to replace the K8 3-way van, the LD150 was a rugged 1 ton van which was powered by either a petrol or diesel engine, both of 2.2L. Badged as either an Austin or Morris, It was discontinued by BMC in 1960. BMC at the time was the largest British car company, with 39 percent of British output, producing a wide range of cars under brand names including Austin, Morris, MG, Austin-Healey, Wolseley as well as commercial vehicles and agricultural tractors.
Model by VITESSE 1/43
1960 Austin J2 Van: Introduced in 1956, the J2 was the first van from Austin to feature unit body construction. Badged as either an Austin or Morris, it was powered by a 1.5L or 1.6L B Series 4-cyl engine. The van was J2 was available in four different body configurations.
Model by OXFORD 1/43
1965 Austin J4 Van: The Austin branded version of the Morris J4 was produced from 1960 to 1968, until the consolidation of British Motor Holdings into British Leyland, when the Morris and Austin versions became the BMC J4 until 1974. The 1/2 ton van was slightly smaller than the J2 van and is powered by either a B Series 1.6L petrol or 1.5L diesel engine.
Model by ALTAYA 1/43
1968 Austin Mini 1000 Van: The iconic Austin Mini with its 1.0L four-cylinder engine and front wheel drive, was a hit on both sides of the Atlantic. Perfect as a light delivery vehicle in urban settings with narrow streets, limited parking and where great maneuverability and operational economy were required.
Model by OXFORD 1/43


BMC - BMW - BREMBO

1955 BMC Leyland LAD Transporter: Introduced in 1950, the Leyland medium to heavy duty COE truck with its new 'Vista Vue' cab was a favorite with lorry drivers in the UK. While not a race support vehicle, BMC used similar transporters to deliver race cars to the ferry and on to France for Le Mans when not transporting production cars for export.
Model by OXFORD 1/76


1975 Ford Transit Van: Started in Italy in 1961, Brembo has become the world leader in competition and performance braking systems. They gained prominence in 1975 by developing the braking systems for Ferrari's F1 cars and Brembo brakes are standard on most high performance and racing cars today.
Model by ALTAYA 1/43


ELVA

1947 Morris Commercial PV Van - 'ELVA CARS': The Morris Commercial PV (Parcel Van) was produced post-WWII from 1946 to 1953 and an estimated 15,000 were built, with few surviving today. Morris built the one ton van on a steel chassis with timber frame and alloy body work, often with a canvas top. It provided a durable walk through van for deliveries and light hauling. Powered by a 2.0L four-cylinder petrol engine, the PV had a top speed of about 50 mph. The average cruising speed for the van was 35 mph! Considering the narrow, winding British roads at the time that was probably fast enough, especially with a loaded trailer and dodgy brakes!
Model by SPARK 1/43
1947 Morris Commercial PV Van - 'ELVA CARS': Frank Nichols started Elva Engineering in 1947, the year this van was made. Elva acquired the van second hand in the early 50's and used it into the early 60's. It was used alongside a Fordson E83W Pickup. Both vehicles were used to regularly tow cars such as the Courier on a trailer to the London Docks for export. From there, the driver would proceed on to Birmingham and Coventry for parts and Coventry Climax engines, returning to Bexhill-on-Sea, Elva's base several hours later. In the late 1950's, the van was used as a race hauler for Elva supported cars raced by Archie Scott-Brown and Robbie Mackenzie-Low.
Model by SPARK 1/43
1947 Morris Commercial PV Van - 'ELVA CARS': This van exists today, although as a recreation of the original Elva van. The van was finally restored in 2006 and was a proud piece of the Elva Racing Components team. Faithfully redone in the Elva colors and signage, this van is a rare walk through van which had no passenger seat. A future project of mine, is to replicate the Elva Fordson pickup in model form, as well as a period Elva car to go with them both. This Morris van is a very nice piece of kit!
Model by SPARK 1/43


FIAT

1978 Fiat 131 Panorama (Fiat/Alitalia): Based on the Series 2 Fiat 131 sedan introduced in 1978, the Panorama estate was powered by a 1.6L four-cylinder OHV engine, producing 74 hp. The Series 2 Panorama was produced until 1981. This car is a service barge for the Fiat Ailtalia Rally Team and was used in 1978-79 when Marrku Allen and Walter Rohr were drivers, both winning the WRC Drivers Championship in 1978 & 1980 respectively.
Model by ALTAYA 1/43

1974-87 Fiat 242 Van (Jolly Club): The 242 was a light commercial van that Fiat built in conjunction with Citroen and was sold in France as the Citroen C35 until 1992. The front wheel drive van had a flat floor which made it a popular van among rally teams for its ability to carry spares and crew in support on a rally. It was powered by a 2.2L Fiat diesel engine. Jolly Club used this van in support of their Lancia and Fiat rally entries.
(Model by IXO 1/43)


HEALEY

1959 Morris LD 150: A bit of whimsy, made during a period of recovery from surgery. The Healey works never had a service vehicle like this, their only service vehicle being a small Austin PU. Instead, they relied on passenger vehicles to get cars and spares to and from Le Mans.
Model by VITESSE (modified)
1963 Austin A110 Westminster: The Healey team in 1970 borrowed Clive Baker's Austin and trailer to tow the XR37 to Le Mans in 1970. Baker ha a Austin Healey 3000 engine fitted to the sedan, which gave it a bit more performance.
Model by Old Irish Racing/K&R Replicas (kit) 1/43
1962 Bussing LU 5/10 M Burglowe Universal Van: Bussing was a German bus and truck maker established in 1903 and was consolidated into MAN in 1971. This is a Universal moving van body on a 5 tonne truck chassis and would have been powered by a six-cylinder diesel. It is used for historic racing and was never a Healey factory transporter.
Model by BERKINA 1/87
1962 Bussing LU 5/10 M Burglowe Universal Van & AH 100


HONDA

1964 Citroen U23 Robustacier Van(Type 23) - Honda: The U23 was first introduced by Citroen in 1935 as a light 2-ton truck. The U23 underwent a major face lift restyling in the 1950's. A popular chassis and basis for light trucks used both by the military and civilian concerns until it went out of production in 1969.
Model by SPARK 1/43
1964 Citroen U23 Robustacier Van(Type 23) - Honda: Honda used the U23 Van for their race car transport in Europe. The 1.9L petrol four-cylinder (1.8L diesel) with 52 BHP and a top speed of 70 KPH would have been capable of transporting a light F1 car and spares. The Robustacier van was made bu the coachworks firm Helilier.
Model by SPARK 1/43


JAGERMEISTER

1970 Mercedes Benz LP 608 - (Jagermeister<)/b>: The popular liqueur maker Jägermeister has been a major sponsor of racing teams in just about every racing discipline. There support has been primarily of German makes such as Porsche and BMW, but they have had their distinctive logo and orange paint on many, many cars over the years.
Model by SCHUCO 1/43

1963 Fiat-Bartoletti 306/2 Type II:
Model by Exoto 1/43
1969 Mercedes Benz L1113 - Jagermeister: The L1113, a medium -duty "Kurzhauber" (short-bonnet) truck with the engine in front of the cab, was manufactured from 1959-1995. The 5.7L direct-injection diesel truck was a popular export, as well as domestic use truck in different configurations.
Model by ALTAYA 1/43


JOHN WYER (JWA) - GULF FORD GT40 & MIRAGE

1967 AEC Regal IV: JW Automotive acquired this AEC transporter built on a Regal bus chasis, which was powered by an in-floor 11.3L diesel engine. First used in the 1968 season, this transporter carried the Le Mans winning GT40s in 1968 & 1969, as well as the Le Mans winning Mirage in the 1970s. It was acquired when JWA was sold in 1976 and is believed to be in the USA.
Model by SPARK 1/43

Le Mans 1968


LIGIER

1971 Saviem S45 - Ligier:  Société Anonyme de Véhicules Industriels et d'Equipements Mécaniques (Saviem) was founded in 1955 as part of the Renault Group. The S45 was a 45 seat bus chassis produced from 1963 for 30-years. It was powerd by a 7.0L, 170 hp MAN diesel.
Model by SPARK 1/43
1971 Saviem S45 - Ligier: For the 1974 season, Equipe Ligier sported new colors of their new sponsor Total on their trusty Saviem transporter. Ligier would campaign the Maserati engined JS2, based on Ligier's road car. They would have moderate success in the World Sports Car Championship, finishing 8th at Le Mans, but finishing 1-2 at the Tour de France Auto. In 1975, the sponsor changed to Gitanes and the power to Ford-Cosworth, with a second place finish at Le Mans.
Model by SPARK 1/43


McLAREN

1965 Bedford TK 860 - McLAREN: When Bruce McLaren started producing his own F1 cars in 1966, the team needed a way to transport their cars across the continent to races on the F1 schedule. They used a Ford truck with van body which could haul two cars, tools and spares. Unable to find a suitable Ford cab, I used this Bedford which resembles the Ford and made the van body from scratch. McLaren used the transporter until 1970, painted papaya orange and white in 1968.
Model by ALTAYA (modified) 1/43

Coming Soon!
1991 Renault AE Magnum - McLAREN: The 1991 International Truck of the Year, the AE Magnum was introduced in 1990, continuing in production until 2013. It was powered by a 503hp Mack turbo-diesel engine and is the first semi to have a mechanically separate cab and engine compartment. Here it is hauling the McLaren works F1 team with Aryton Senna repeating as World Drivers Championship in 1991 and McLaren winning the F1 Constructors Championship in both 1990 & 1991.
Model by LOUIS SURBER 1/43

1967 Chevrolet C30 Ramp Truck
Model by ACME 1/18
McLaren Ford Ramp Truck - Can Am: McLaren used this Ford F350 ramp truck throughout the Can Am series to transport their race cars. The two ramp trucks modeled here are representative of the McLaren truck and ramp trucks used by a variety of racing teams.
1970 Ford F350
Model by ACME 1/18


MG

1953 Ford Thames ET6: From 1959 through 1961, a private effort to race an MGA Twin Cam at Le Mans was undertaken. The effort was spearheaded by Ted Lund, a former factory MG driver.
Model by IXO (modified) 1/43
1953 Ford Thames ET6: Funded by an MG Club and investors, the effort In 1960 used a flat bed Ford that belonged to a team member and supporter, was employed to haul the car and spares to Le Mans.
Model by IXO (modified) 1/43
1958 Land Rover 88: Ted Lund who drove the car all three years had purchased the MGA from MG and ran in 1961 as a private effort. The car was towed to France behind Lund's Land Rover.
Model by TSM 1/43


OLD IRISH RACING - Purely Fiction

2014 RAM Sprinter 2500: This was a decal making exercise and could I fit a logo from each major marque and racing team in my collection?
Model by ELGIOR 1/43
2015 Ford Transit 250: For grins, a mock-up of the Old Irish Racing support van.
Model by GREENLIGHT (modified) 1/43
2018 RAM Promaster 2500


PEGASO

1952 Pegaso Bacalao: Pegaso's parent company Enasa (Spanish state owned) was formed in 1946 and Pegaso located in the former Hispano-Suiza factory with under the direction of the renowned automotive engineer Wifredo Ricart. Trucks and buses were manufactured under the Pegaso name, with the manufacture of sports cars in 1951, to train apprentices, and create a good brand image. Part of creating that image was racing and Pegaso created this transporter in 1952 for transporting their GT cars to race events around Europe. Called Bacalo or Codfish because of its distinctive body style, it was made on a Pegaso bus chassis and designed to carry two Z102 race cars. It was powered by a 140 hp diesel engine with one central seat for the driver. Oddly, there was no other seating for additional crew.
Model by SALVAT 1/43
1952 Pegaso Bacalao: Pegaso found that while it was designed to carry two cars one above the other, the fit was so tight that only one car was carried in it at a time. At Le Mans in 1953, and they brought three cars to Le Mans, two entries plus a reserve car. This transporter brought one car and team spares, with the other two cars arriving in Pegaso trucks. During practice, one of the cars unexplainably left the road at high speed and crashed heavily, severely injuring the driver. The other car was subsequently withdrawn from the race and Le Mans was the only major race Pegaso ever entered. The transporter was used by Pegaso sporadically after that at minor events and hill climbs until 1957. It briefly was used in the mid-1960's to carry a Spanish team's pair of Lotus F2 cars, but ultimately ended up in a salvage yard and was scrapped. A sad end to what was once a magnificent looking transporter.
Model by SALVAT 1/43


ROB WALKER RACING

1968 Ford D Series: Ford introduced the D Series in 1965 to replace the Thames Trader. To compete with GM’s Bedford TK, the truck was given an updated appearance with cab over engine design, which was popular in the US at the time. The tilting cab was access to the engine and was a one man operation. It was powered by three diesel options, a 4-cylinder 3.97L and two six-cylinder versions of 5.42L and 5.95L; the latter producing 128 bhp. The truck could carry a payload of up to 12.75 British tons. The D Series stayed in production until 1981.
Model by MEAkits 1/43
1968 Ford D Series: This transporter used by Rob Walkers racing team in the late 1960’s took them through their final season in 1970, when Graham Hill drove Walkers Lotus 72C. It often carried two cars, the newer 72C and the older Lotus 49 as backup. Walker was one of the most successful priateers in racing, especially F1. Great drivers such as Stirling Moss and Jo Siffert gave Walker epic victories in both open wheel, as well as sports cars. When he retired his F1 team in 1970 after twelve years at the pinnicle of racing, his team had claimed nine victories.
Model by MEAkits 1/43
1968 Ford D Series:
Model by MEAkits 1/43


SAFETY VEHICLES

1965 Citroen DS 19 Ambulance: The DS model was made from 1955-1975 and underwent several transformations during that twenty year span. What was constant though was the hydraulic suspension, clutch and transmission, which provided a smooth ride. Perfect for a small ambulance built utilizing the wagon/estate version of the DS.
Model by ATLAS 1/43
1969 Jaguar XJ12 - Silverstone: Jaguar loaned the Silverstone Circuit the prototype XJ12 to be used as a high-speed fire tender. It was used at the circuit for a number of years before a newer Jaguar model was supplied.
Model by VANGUARDS 1/43
1970 Citroen SM - Gendarmerie: The ever present police force at Le Mans. With its high performance 3.0L Maserati engine, it would have made a formidable pursuit vehicle, or in this case, suitable for a ranking officer on the force.
Model by NOREV 1/43
2006 Audi Q7 - Le Mans: One of four rapid response vehicles disbursed throughout the Le Mans Circuit, the medical car carries doctors that can be deployed immediately to an accident quickly, anywhere on the track. Audi supplied the Q7, their mid-size 3.0L TDI engine SUV in 2006.
Model by SCHUCO 1/43


SCUDERIA CENTRO SUD - TEAM TYRRELL

1957 OM Leoncino : "Mimmo" Dei, a Rome Maserati dealer, started Centro Sud in 1956 and the team was active in F1 and sports car racing until 1965. Primarily fielding Maserati's, the team also campaigned Coopers and BRM's in F1. Dei was a former race driver and had a knack for spotting and attracting talented drivers to his team, though he never won a F1 race. He also sponsored the first female F1 driver in 1958, Maria Teresa de Filppis. The OM Fiat Leoncino was a popular choice among race teams, as well as light haulers across Europe. Introduced in 1950, the Leoncino was available in 2-2.5 ton capacity and later became the basis for heavier OM trucks and transporters. With a top speed of 48 mph produced from its 4.6L 4-cylinder diesel engine, I can imagine it bumping down the back roads of Europe to the next race.
Model by Altaya 1/43
1957 OM Leoncino : Among the all-star list of drivers for Centro Sud were Luigi Volloresi, Harry Schell, Jo Bonnier, Masten Gregory, Carroll Shelby and Lorenzo Bandini. Centro Sud refers to the parts of Italy where Dei was from.
Model by Altaya 1/43
1969 Leyland World Master: Team Tyrrell set new standards for the F1 paddock with this big sic-cylinder diesl powered transporter, which easily handled the narrow roads of Europe. Room for six-crew, three or four cars and all the spares, this was what got Championships won, long before three or four semi's were required!
Model by SPARK 1/43
1969 Leyland World Master: The distinctive blue and white transporter sported the same livery as th World Championship winning cars of Jackie Stewart in both 1971 and 1973. Team Tyrell took delivery of the transporter in late 1969, just after the split with Matra.
Model by SPARK 1/43


TOYOTA

1993 Mercedes Benz 814D: The Mercedes 814D was a member of the second generation of T2 family of full size heavy commercial vans. Produced from 1986-1996, the 814 had a 5.9L six-cylinder diesel engine (132 hp) coupled to a 5-speed manual transmission. The 8-ton van (7.5 tonne) sat on a longer wheelbase and had an overall length of 23 feet (6996 mm). The van was used by Toyota Team Europe from 1992-1993, a period in which it won three WRC Championships.
Model by ALTAYA 1/43
1993 Mercedes Benz 814D: Toyota team drivers won the World Rally Championship three consecutive years with Carlos Sainz in 1992, Juila Kakkunen in 1993 and Didier Auriol in 1994. Toyota also won the Manufactures Championship in 1993 and 1994. The Championships al came with the 2.0L (300 HP) Celica Turbo 4WD (ST185) which dominated rallying in the mid-1990's. Unfortunately, caught part way through the WRC 1995 season, resulted in a season ban from Toyota Europe's direct WRC participation and another possible championship.
Model by ALTAYA 1/43


BARRIE SMITH - TOUR DE FRANCE - WILLIAMS F1

1960's Bedford Van - Barrie Smith: A superb Le Mans privateer success story! Barrie got Kodak France to sponsor his Lola T90 at Le Mans in 1972, and his races in France that season. He finished 1st in the 2.0L class and 14th overall. Barrie made his career after racing as an accomplished photographer.
Model by: Corgi (modified)
1953 Berliet Caimon PIK8 - Tour de France:
Model by ALTAYA 1/43

1992 Renault R 350 Major - WILLIAMS: The R series was Renault's heavy duty truck produced from 1980-1996 and came about as a result of the consolidation of Saviem and Berliet. The R was equipped with Renault's 12-litre G-series inline-six turbodiesel and was well suited to haul the Williams Renault F1 team to its championship victories.
Model by LOUIS SURBER 1/43


GAS & OIL VEHICLES

1960 Fiat 1100 T2 - Castrol: The Fiat 1100 T was made from 1957 as a panel van, pickup and minibus. The car was equipped with a in-line engine with 1,089 cc (type 103 D.007) with 38 PS (28 kW) at 4800 rpm and it had a top speed of 90 km/h (56 mph). In 1959, its successor was unveiled, the Fiat 1100 T2, that had a 45 PS (33 kW) 1,222 cc engine.[24] Production continued with a steady stream of updated engines, until production of the 1100 T4 finally came to an end in 1971.
Model by ALTAYAI 1/43
1950 Bedford O Series - Duckhams
Model by CORGI 1/43
1950 Citroen 2CV Fourgonnett Van - Esso
1950 Renault Galion 2T5 - Esso
Model by ALTAYA 1/43

1955 Somua/Panhard JL17T - Esso: The Somua Bus & Truck Co.and Panhard companies merged just after WWII. The JL17 had a large 8.6L six-cylinder diesel engine, which produced 130hp. This is also a Panhard K224?
Model by FRENCH DINKY 1/60?
Le Mans Paddock 1959 - Esso
1960 Leyland Octopus - Esso
Model by DINKY 1/50
1950 Foden S18 FG6/15 - Mobilgas: Foden introduced this rigid eight wheeled truck in 1948. For the heaviest loads, an upgraded Gardner diesel engine of 150 bhp was available over the Foden two-stroke. The truck has a capcity of 14 tons.
Model by DINKY 1/50

1958 Fiat 1100E Van - Shell:
Model by BRUMM 1/43
1968 Renault Estafette Van - Shell:
Model by ALTAYA 1/43
1994 GMC Sierra - Exxon: The fourth generation GM C/K truck was versitile hauler with a 6.5L V8 diesel engine. Exxon sponsored the IMSA World Sports Car Championship from 1994-1996 and made a series of transporters promoting that sponsorship. This rig comes with a pair of Riley & Scott MkIII's run by Doyle Racing.
Model by UNKNOWN 1/43
1995 Kenworth T600 - Exxon: The 1995 transporter for the Exxon sponsered IMSA World Sports Car Championship from 1994-1996. This is the 5th series of models produced for Exxon. Carries 4 cars (not included), features Ferrari 333SP which won the Championship in 1995 with Scandia Racing.
Model by UNKNOWN 1/43

1960 Citroen Type H Furgone - Bardahl: The H Type van was produced from 1947 to 1981 in factories in both France and Belgium. A small, compact light weight van, it competed with the VW van of the period. Its popularity resulted in almost a half-million vans being produced. Using a detuned Traction Avant engine, the van had a 1.9L petrol, four-cylinder engine. It is turn produced a top-speed of 60 mph (100 kph).
Model by ELGIOR 1/43
1960 Citroen Type H Furgone - Bardahl: The H Type van featured a corrugated sheet metal body, which in turn provided additional strength to the panels without increasing weight. Something common in early aircraft up into WWII.
Model by ELGIOR 1/43
1956 Somua JL19 - BP: Made from 1955-1962, the JL19 was a heavy 29 ton (26 tonnes) French truck available in five different chassis configurations. Somua and Latil, the heavy vehicle division of Renault, merged about the time the JL19 was introduced and became LRS. They later became a part of Saviem. The JL19 had a 9.3L diesel six-cylinder engine mated to a 10-speed transmission and produced 180 hp. Seen here in BP Energol livery, these trucks would have been a common paddock sight in the 1950-s and early 60's.
Model by ELGIOR 1/43


TIRE COMPANY VEHICLES

1927 Talbot Van - Dunlop: The box says 1927, but its not clear what Talbot this van is based on (14-45?), but it is known that Talbot which began in 1903, made many light to medium duty trucks during WWI. After the war, a major part of the business was refurbishing these vehicles, so it may stem from that era.
Model by MATCHBOX 1/43
This van made a great subject for this diorama set in 1929, as the the tow vehicle for Sir Henry Segrave's massive Golden Arrow. Segrave set a new record of 231.35 mph on the sands of Daytona Beach with the 23.9L Napier aero engined car.

1958 Opel Blitz 1.75T - Dunlop
Model by NEO 1/43
1961 Mercedes Benz L319 - Dunlop
Model by NEO 1/43
1962 Merceds Benz LP9111 - Dunlop
Model by PREMIUM CLASSIXXS 1/43
1970 Merceds Benz LP608 - Dunlop
Model by PREMIUM CLASSIXXS 1/43

1956 Willeme LD610T - Dunlop: Willeme was a French firm which made heavey trucks and buses between 1923 and 1970. The trucks were powered by German Deutz diesel engines primarily, but also AEC engines. In the 1960's they sold rebadged AEC and BMC trucks.
Model by NOREV 1/43
1956 Willeme LD610T - Dunlop
Model by NOREV 1/43
1956 Willeme LD610T - Dunlop

1970 Saviem JM240 - Firestone
Model by ALTAYA (modified) 1/43
1970 Saviem JM240 - Firestone
Model by ALTAYA (modified) 1/43
1972 Ford Transit Van - Firestone
Model by SPARK 1/43
1972 Ford Transit Van - Firestone
Model by SPARK 1/43

1962 Renault Estafette Van - Michelin
Model by ALTAYA 1/43
1972 Fiat 1100T - Michelin
Model by ALTAYA 1/43
1972 Saviem SG2 - Michelin
Model by ALTAYA 1/43
MICHELIN

1978 Ford CLT-9000 - Shelby Enterprises: Carroll Shelby obtained the Goodyear Racing Tire distribution rights for eleven western US States in 1959. The tire business is what carried Shelby after he retired from racing and until he could obtain backing for his Cobra project. In the 1971 after his contract with Ford had expired and the demise of Shelby American, Shelby moved the tire business and started Shelby Wheel Co. under the Carroll Shelby Enterprises banner. Shelby expanded the tire business in the 1970's and his company's trucks were and still are a common sight at racetracks in the Western United States.
Model by ALTAYA 1/43 (modified)
1978 Ford CLT-9000 - Shelby Enterprises: Ford introduced the CLT-9000 in 1977 as a totally new design in over the road semi-trucks. Made in Louisville, Kentucky, with its "two-story' cab over engine, the Ford's were some of the first to put driver comfort at the fore. With its full air suspension ride, comfortably appointed interior and sleeper, they really became the standard of comfort for drivers that made their living crossing America's highways. Ford backed it up with performance too, with diesel engines of up to 600hp, delivered through a 13-speed transmission. These trucks were produced until 1990 when Ford sold its heavy truck business.
Model by ALTAYA 1/43 (modified)
1978 Ford CLT-9000 - Shelby Enterprises: When I first saw a picture of the Altaya Ford CLT-9000 with Goodyear trailer, I immediately thought of the Carroll Shelby trucks I saw in race paddocks dozens of times in the 70's and 80's. Unfortunately, I have not found a precise history of Shelby's tire business, let alone pictures of the trucks from that era. So for now, I have created some decals with what I believe to be the correct business structure and location (based off an image of a Shelby company check) for the late 1970's when the Ford truck was new. I am going to continue to search and if needed, they can be changed later.
Model by ALTAYA 1/43 (modified)

1939 Citroen TUB- Michelin: The TUB was a light van produced from 1939 to 1941. It was based on the Traction Avant passenger car and used the same 35 hp, 4-Cylinder engine. Extreme frontal weight bias made these vans a handful, unless fully loaded.
Model by ALTAYA 1/43
1952 Fiat 1100 ELR - Pirelli: After WWII, Fiat introduced a light commercial vehicle based on the 1100 passenger car. Propelled by a 1.1L four-cylinder engine, it was reported to be capable of a top speed of 88 mph. However, that was probably unloaded, downhill with a tail wind. Like most of the commercial vehicles of its day, the 1100 ELR was an efficient light delivery vehicle, right sized for the narrow European streets it would have called home.
Model by ALTAYA 1/43


OTHER TRUCKS & SUPPORT VEHICLES

1947 Austin K8 Three-Way Van - MANN EGGERTON:
Model by OXFORD 1/43
1947 Austin K8 Three-Way Van
1947 Austin K8 Three-Way Van - ERIC OLIVER:
Model by OXFORD 1/43

1960 Unic MZ36 TCA:
Model by ALTAYA 1/43

1959 VW T1 Kombi - 'MAX MEYER': Founded in 1895, Max Meyer Carrozzeria is an Italian firm that is a leader in automotive paint and finishing products.
Model by ALTAYA 1/43
1970 Citroen DS 21 Break - Total: The DS advanced achievable standards in automobile ride quality, handling, and braking. Powered by a 2.4L four-cyl. engine, with its hydropneumatic automatic levelling suspension system, it was a great race/rally support vehicle.
Model by NOREV 1/43


LAND & RANGE ROVER

1960 Land Rover Series II - Donald Campbell/Bluebird: When I was a young impressionable lad growing up in the early 1960's, land and water speed record attempts were often front page news. In the jet age, American's were fascinated with what seemed like new records being set and old ones broken almost weekly. The idea that breaking the sound barrier on land might be possible, was riveting and so, record breaking was news more important than just for the sports pages. The fact that almost all land speed record attempts in the early 1960's were being done at Bonneville, gave the proceedings a nationalistic feel, even if the drivers might not be American. In this time, I came to admire Craig Breedlove, the Arfon's and Summer's brothers, but most particularly, Donald Campbell.
Model by TSM 1/43
1960 Land Rover Series II - Donald Campbell/Bluebird: The Series II Landy needs no introduction I'm sure. TSM have done their usual superb job of modeling the Land Rover. This iconic staple of on and off road adventures was part of the big launch of the Bluebird CN7 at Silverstone in 1960, as well as the actual ill-fated LSR attempts in Utah later that summer. One of my books shows what appears to be the same Land Rover again at Lake Eyre in Australia for the aborted attempt at reclaiming the record in 1963.
Model by TSM 1/43
1960 Land Rover Series II - Donald Campbell/Bluebird: It's uncertain to me if the Rover was used again for the successful attempt to reclaim the LSR in 1964 at 403.10 mph. Most likely it was given Campbell's finances at the time. There is also a photo in one of my books of his water speed record breaking attempt in Australia in 1964 that shows a portion of a front fender which I think is this Landy. Here it is seen with the Bluebird as it appeared in 1963 & 1964 with the rear tail fin. A fine addition to my LSR collection and Campbell memorabilia.
Model by TSM 1/43

1955 Leyland LAD Transporter - Land Rover: A fresh load of Series One Land Rovers for delivery.
Model by OXFORD 1/76

1965 Land Rover Series One: Even the durable, dependable Land Rover needs assistance from time to time!
Model by TSM MODEL 1/43
1958 Land Rover 109:  Helping deliver the bright and shiny new tractor.
Model by OXFORD 1/43


Model by 1/43

1965 Land Rover Series One: Even the durable, dependable Land Rover needs assistance from time to time!
Model by TSM MODEL 1/43
1958 Land Rover 109:  Helping deliver the bright and shiny new tractor.
Model by OXFORD 1/43

1970 Range Rover:
Model by WHITE BOX 1/43
1982 Land Rover 109 Safari:
Model by HONGWELL 1/43
2012 Range Rover Sport:
Model by UNIVERSAL HOBBY 1/43
2013 Range Rover Evoque:
Model by TRIPLE 9 1/43


MISC. TRUCKS AND VANS


CARNATION

1953 White 3000 COE:
Model by FIRST GEAR (modified) 1/34

1953 White 3000 COE:
Model by FIRST GEAR (modified) 1/34

1953 White 3000 COE:
Model by FIRST GEAR (modified) 1/34
1953 White 3000 COE:
Model by FIRST GEAR (modified) 1/34
1953 White 3000 COE:
Model by FIRST GEAR (modified) 1/34
1953 White 3000 COE:
Model by FIRST GEAR (modified) 1/34

1954 GMC 950 COE "Cannonball": The GMC 950 COE "Cannonball" was part of the H-series of light and heavy duty GM trucks introduced in 1949 and made for ten years. COE (cab over engine) designs became popular as truck makers sought to minimize tractor length in order to give truckers maximum trailer length under the new interstate trucking regulations in the United States. They were available in two and three axle tractor units, with nine different gasoline engine sizes and two diesel engine options. To carry a load of cars, this truck likely had one of the big block V8 or diesel engine options.
Model by ALTAYA 1/43 1/43
1954 GMC 950 COE "Cannonball": While it kind of has the shape of one, the truck got its nickname Cannonball from a short-lived Canadian TV show by that name, which featured one of these trucks. Fleet Carrier Corp. was a nationwide hauler of new vehicles to dealerships based out of Pontiac, Michigan. While they delivered all makes, they were the designated hauler for GM. At one time a familiar sight on the road, the company at one time discontinued its fleet services and was in the truck rental and leasing business, but no longer appears to be in business (at least under that name.)
Model by ALTAYA 1/43 1/43
1956 Ford F-600 (Art Castor):
Model by Automodello 1/43


TRUCKS AND VANS AWAITING CONVERSION

There are a number of trucks and vans out there which would lend themselves very well to making replicas of rigs used by racing teams form the 1950's to the 1980's. Here are some of the trucks and vans I currently have awaiting an eventual make over.
1976 Kenworth K100 COE Aerodyne: Kenworth has been making trucks since 1923 and has been a subsidiary of PACCAR along with its sister brand Peterbuilt since 1945. The K100 Aerodyne introduced in 1976 featured the first manufactured sleeper cab that allowed full stand up capability.
Model by IXO 1/43
1976 Kenworth K100 COE Aerodyne: Despite sometimes being difficult to climb out of, cab over designs were popular up until the late 1970's, as length restrictions limited a tractor and trailer combination to 65 feet (19.8 meters). Powered by a 14.6L 6-cylinder turbocharged Cummings diesel producing 300 bhp, these massive tractors were once a common sight on American roads.
Model by IXO 1/43
1979 Peterbuilt 352: Even though the length of a tractor trailer semi combo had been increased to 74 feet, cab over trucks were still popular for their greater maneuverability; especially on short hauls and delivery work. The 352 model was built from 1959 to 1980 and was Peterbuilt's first cab over engine truck.
Model by IXO 1/43
1979 Peterbuilt 352: Originally equipped with a Cummings 290 hp diesel engine, the tractor was noted for its torque, an important feature when pulling loads up hills and mountain passes. The top legal truck speed in the USA was still 55 mph. Like many cab over trucks built after 1976, it features a shorter chassis to maximize rig length to fit new regulations.
Model by IXO 1/43

1956 Fiat 615N:
Model by EAGLEMOSS 1/43
1952 Fiat 615:
Model by EAGLEMOSS 1/43
1950 OM Leoncino Furgone:
Model by EAGLEMOSS 1/43

RACING TRANSPORTERS, SUPPORT VEHICLES AND OTHER TRUCKS Pt.1


To continue to another section of the Old Irish Racing Collection, select one of the following:

THE SIGNATURE PROJECT & RACING DIORAMAS

RACING TRANSPORTERS, SUPPORT VEHICLES AND OTHER TRUCKS Pt.1
RACING TRANSPORTERS, SUPPORT VEHICLES AND OTHER TRUCKS Pt.2


JAGUAR RACING CARS:
To 1959
1960 - 1979
1980 - 1989
1990's - Present

GROUP 44, Inc., JAGUAR & TRIUMPH

JAGUAR AT LE MANS

JAGUAR AUTOMOBILIA

JAGUAR PRODUCTION CARS:
1926 to 1959
1960 to 1968
1969-1987
1988 - Present

JAGUAR CONCEPT CARS

EACH JAGUAR MODEL FROM 1935 IN PRODUCTION ORDER

FERRARI RACING CARS:
1949 - 1959
1960 - 1969
1970 - 1979
1980 - Present

FERRARI FORMULA ONE

FERRARI PRODUCTION CARS

PORSCHE RACING & PRODUCTION CARS:
1950 - 1969
1970 - 1979
1980 - 1989
1990 - Present

BRUMOS RACING TEAM

PORSCHE PRODUCTION CARS

FORMULA 1, GRAND PRIX, INDY:
1900 - 1959
1960 - 1969
1970 - 1979
1980 - PRESENT

GREAT AUTOMOTIVE MAKES & RACING TEAMS:

AMERICAN MARQUES:
CHAPARRAL
CHEVROLET & GM POWER
CUNNINGHAM EQUIPE
FORD POWER: GT40's, MUSTANGS, MIRAGE & MORE
SHELBY-FORD'S: COBRAS, DAYTONAS, GT40's & MUSTANGS
AMERICAN MADE (MISC. MARQUES)

BRITISH MARQUES:
ASTON MARTIN RACE & PRODUCTION
AUSTIN HEALEY & HEALEY
BRM F1 & SPORTS CARS
ECURIE ECOSSE
LOLA SPORTS CARS
LOTUS RACE & PRODUCTION
MG CARS
TRIUMPH RACE & PRODUCTION
BRITISH MADE (MISC. MARQUES)

ITALIAN MARQUES:
ABARTH RACING
ALFA ROMEO RACE & PRODUCTION
LANCIA RACE & PRODUCTION
MASERATI RACE & PRODUCTION
ITALIAN & SPANISH MADE (MISC. MARQUES)

GERMAN & SWEDISH MARQUES:
AUDI RACING
BMW RACE & PRODUCTION
MERCEDES BENZ
GERMAN & SWEDISH MADE (MISC. MARQUES)

ASIAN, AUSTRALIAN & NEW ZEALAND MARQUES:
BRABHAM
DATSUN/NISSAN RACING
McLAREN RACING
TOYOTA RACE & PRODUCTION
ASIAN, AUSTRALIAN & NEW ZEALAND MADE (MISC. MARQUES)

FRENCH MARQUES:
FRENCH MADE (MISC. MARQUES)

LAND SPEED RECORD CARS

VETERAN, CLASSIC & SPECIAL INTEREST CARS All MARQUES

THE TRIPLE CROWN OF ENDURANCE RACES:
THE 24 HOURS of LE MANS 1923-2020
THE 12 Hours of SEBRING WINNERS
THE 24 HOURS of DAYTONA WINNERS

DRIVER TRIBUTES:
THE OLD IRISH RACING HALL OF FAME
JUAN MANUEL FANGIO TRIBUTE
STIRLING MOSS TRIBUTE
WORLD DRIVER & CONSTRUCTORS CHAMPIONS 1950 - 1985

PLAY BALL! - IT'S BASEBALL TIME:
A TRIBUTE TO BOYHOOD HEROES AND MY DAD

For copies of images, questions or comments about the collection to: OLD IRISH RACING

Back to: OLD IRISH RACING MODELS INDEX Home Page

Back to: OLD IRISH RACING Home Page

Legal stuff: Content and images on this website are the property and content of Old Irish Racing and may not be used without permission. Old Irish Racing is not affiliated with, or represent any other entity. All pages on this website Copyright-Old Irish Racing 2022
This is a private collection, pieces are not for sale!

PLEASE NOTE: From 1968 into the 1990's tobacco companies sponsored many significant race cars. We don't promote tobacco use, rather we stronly discourage it. However, we do promote historical accuracy, Old Irish Racing chooses to display models in our collection as historically accurate as possible. While seeing a tobacco advert on a car gives me no more desire to go smoke than seeing a car makes me want to go suck on its exhaust pipe. If tobacco (or alcohol) adverts on race cars offend you, please go look at nice pictures of bunnies and kittens on another site. Thank you!