Misc. Italian & Spanish Race, Sports & GT Cars

Italian Race Cars
1947 Cisitalia 202 SMM: The name "Cisitalia" derives from "Consorzio Industriale Sportive Italia", Using a Fiat 60 hp, 1100 cc engine with Pinnin Farina styled aluminium body, at the 1947 Mille Miglia, the Cistitalia spider really proved itself by leading most of the race in capable hands of Tazio Nuvolari and co-driver Francesco Carena. Despite having competition with engines three times larger, Nuvolari held back the competition placing 2nd overall and 1st in class.
Model by STARLINE 1/43
1952 Fiat 8V: Created to compete in the 2-litre Italian Championship against the likes of Ferrari, Lancia and Maserati, the successful 8V was the only 8 cyl. Fiat made. Powered by a alloy V8 producing 124 hp, about 30 lightweight Zagato bodied cars on tube frames were built. This car competed in the 1956 Mille Miglia.
Model by STARLINE 1/43
1954 OSCA MT-4: Providence smiled on Briggs Cunningham's team at Sebring in 1954. With drivers Stirling Moss and Bill Lloyd at the wheel, their OSCA outlasted and out distanced the field of sixty cars that started the race in their 1.5L car. The trio of Fangio, Ascari and Taruffi in their Lancia D-24's were expected to win the race. Instead, the torrid pace that was set between the Lancia, Ferrari, Jaguar and Aston Martin entries with the favored big bore cars falling by the wayside as the race wore on. With only 130bhp and a top speed of 120mph, Moss and Lloyd were able to reduce brake wear and consistently lap in the lighter weight OSCA. They finished five laps ahead of the second place Lancia D24 and third pace Austin Healey 100S.
Model by JOLLY MODEL 1/43
1954 OSCA MT-4: Coming off its astonishing win at Sebring, Automobili OSCA entered this car and a sister car at Le Mans in 1954. Powered by OSCA's latest twin-plug 1.5L engine, both cars were leading their class with two hours to go in the race. Then it all came unraveled. The second OSCA was wiped out in an accident at Mulsanne corner. This car driven by Pierre Leygonie and Lance Macklin while in seventh overall and leading the class, Leygonie spun the car into the barrier. He ran back to the pits to get mechanics to help coach him on making the car drivable again, which he did and limped to the pits. Still in 10th and leading their class, Macklin took over and drove the remaining distance; only to be disqualified at the end because his co-driver had "abandoned" the car. Porsche claimed the important class win.
Model by SPARK 1/43

1955 750 Bisilero (1955 Le Mans): Before making steering wheels and other auto accessories Nardi built cars based on Fiat 500 chassis and BMW motorcycle engine power. "Bisilero", or twin-torpedo was the name given to this unusual car Nardi, the former Lancia driver and mechanic, designed for Le Mans in 1955. With the driver and fuel tank in one pod, the engine and transmission in the other, the car borrowed from auto, motorcycle, boat and aero designs. Powered by a BMW 750 cc engine producing 55 hp, the radiator sat in the panel separating the two pods. There was also an air brake in the center. Driven by Roger Crovetto and Mario Damonte, the car only made 5 laps before it crashed in the 3rd hour. It seems as the faster cars started to lap it, a passing Jaguar D-Type's airstream wake "blew" the Nardi off the track and into a ditch, ending its race.
Model by BIZARRE 1/43
1956 OSCA 1500 TN: The Maserati brothers OSCA firm began in 1947 building light yet fast sports cars primarily for racing. The cars carried a variety of Fiat based engine sizes, with the most popular being the 1.0L cars. In 1955, they began building ten special cars that would carry a 1.5L engine and the twin-spark 4 cly. engine produce 118 hp. The cars were fast in the early stages of the race, but could not maintain the pace as they headed up to the mountain passes. For Luigi Villoresi who drove this car solo in the rain soaked 1956 Mille, his engine expired during the sixth hour of the race trying to match the pace of the Ferrari's who finished the race in the top four places.
Model by STARLINE 1/43
1966 Bizzarrini P538S: Former Alfa Romeo and Ferrari engineer Giotto Bizzarrinni started his his own company to make technologically advanced sports and racing cars. In 1966 he created this ultra low car specifically for racing at Le Mans and two or three were built. This car (#0003) was powered by a 5.3L V8 engine from a Corvette and it was recorded as one of the fastest cars down the Mulsanne straight. Unfortunately for drivers Edgar Berney and Andre Wicky, the car retired with a broken oil pipe in the first half hour of the 1966 Le Mans race.
Model by SPARK 1/43
1985 Lamborghini Countach QVX: The QVX was a Group C race car to contest the 1986 World Sportscar Championship season. It used a Spice built chassis and a developed Lamborghini Countach's V12 5.7L engine. The car was commissioned by Lamborghini's British importer who wanted to race a Countach in Group B, but could not since there were not enough production cars made for homologation. So instead, turning to Group C, with factory assistance in engine development a car was constructed which showed great potential. Tiff Needell and Mauro Baldi were enlisted as the car's drivers, but as often the case in racing; limited funds limited the QVX to one race. Needell placed high enough in the twonon-championship rounds of the 1986 500 km at Kyalami to place fifth overall.
Model by ALTAYA 1/43

2003 Lamborghini Murciélago GT RG-1: Only nine Murciélago R-GT's were built for competition in conjunction with Audi Sport and Reiter Engineering who primarily campaigned the cars in the early stages. The cars competed in the FIA GT1 Championship, American Le Mans series and at Le Mans in 2006, 2007 & 2009. Rear wheel drive, driven by a 6.0L V12 putting out 580 bhp, these cars had potential, but lacked total commitment from Lamborghini to properly test and sort these cars out. This car, raced at Le Mans in 2006 by the Japanese Lamborghini Owners Club But was not classified at the finish, with Marco Apicella, Kouji Yamanishi & Yasutaka Hinoi driving.
Model by METRO 1/43
2011 Lamborghini Gallardo LP600-4: Frédéric Fatien, Fabien Giroix, Karim Al Azhari, and Andrea Barlesi drove this entry for Gulf Racing (UAE) in the Pro-Am class at the Spa 24 Hours in 2011. A faulty clutch ended their race. Despite the Gulf colors, the car only completed one race in the Blancpain World Endurance Series for GT3 cars in 2011. Powered by a 5.2L V10 mid-engine producing 605 hp, the aluminum chassis cars weer widely raced with succes in GT3 events around the globe.
Model by FUJIMI 1/43

ITALIAN PRODUCTION CARS

1951 Fiat-Abarth 205A Vignale Berlinetta: Only three of these cars were produced between 1950-1951, this being the third chassis and Carlo Abarth's personal car. Powered by an Abarth tuned Fiat 1.1L cc four-cyl. engine, and raced in major events such as the Mille Miglia, where a 205 finished 2nd in class and 6th overall
Model by M4 1/43
1954 Fiat Turbina: In 1954 Fiat was the first car manufacturer in Europe to introduce a car propelled by a gas turbine. The engine had two compressor stages, one turbine stage, power turbine was single stage with a geared reduction. The declared power was 300 hp at 22.000 rpm, and the estimated top speed was approximately 155 mph. The Turbina held the record for lowest drag coefficient on an automobile for 30 years.
Model by METRO 1/43
1955 Fiat Multipla: Then on the other hand... Produced between 1956-1965, the Mulitpla was based on the Fiat 600. It sat 6 people in a footprint just 20" longer than the original Mini Cooper. Its 633 c.c. engine gave it a top speed of 57 mph and a 0-60 speed of 43 seconds! Che cosa posso dire?
Model by NOREV 1/43
1955 Fiat Multipla: Another cute Multipla, this one is being used as a commercial vehicle either advertising or being in the business of selling Ramazzotti liqueurs. Perhaps stopped by the phone booth to call in an order?
Model by BRUMM 1/43

1963 Lamborghini 350 GTV: Presented at the 1963 Turin Auto Show, the 350 GTV was Lamborghini's first prototype and the precursor to the 350 GT. With distinctive fastback styling by Franco Scaglione and built by Carrozzeria Sargiotto, the beautiful body sat on a tube frame chassis and was to be powered by a 3.5L V12 racing engine producing 385 bhp. Alas, the body panels did not fit properly around the engine, so it was always shown without, using bricks for ballast!
Model by ALTAYA/IXO 1/43
1965 Lamborghini 350 GT: Produced from 1964-66, the 350GT, its Touring Superleggera body framework of small steel tubes, skinned with aluminium was Lamboghini's first production car. The 3.5L DOHC V12 produces 280 bhp, which is good for a top speed of 160 mph. This was a smooth-running, sophisticated high-performer that was generally faster and technically ahead of everything Ferrari had been offering up to that time. One of our favorites!
Model by MINICHAMPS 1/43
1965 Fiat 1600S Cabriolet: Seldom seen on the US side of the Atlantic, the 1600S is an attractive Pininfarinia designed convertible containing Fiat mechanical components with a racing heritage. The Maserati brothers at OSCA engineered the 1.6L four-cylinder, DOHC engine and it produced 90 bhp, for a top speed of just under 100 mph. With four wheel disc brakes, a five-speed transmission and decent performance, it is a very nice four-seat open touring car.
Model by NOREV 1/43

1968 Lamborghini Miura P400S: The Miura was a trendsetter, the one that made the mid-engined layout de rigueur among two-seater high performance sports cars. Early Miuras, were powered by a version of the 3.9 L Lamborghini V12 engine used in the 400GT at the time, only mounted transversely and producing 365 hp. About 338 P400S Miura were produced between December 1968 and March 1971.
Model by RIO 1/43
1971 Lamnborghini Miura P400 SV: The P400 SV version of the Miura had revised rear body work to handle the wider rear tires, a limited slip diff and better cam timing and carburetion. The result was an engine which now produced 385 hp and the Miura 4.0L V12 was capable of propelling the car to 180 mph. A total of 150 P400 SV models were made from 1971-1973, before production of the Miura gave way to the Countach..
Model by MININCHAMPS 1/43
1984 Lamborghini Countach LP550 S: Often included as one of the top sports cars from the '70's & '80's, the Countach pioneered the angled look in exotic sports cars, as well as cab forward design which allowed a larger mid-mounted engine. The LP 500 S was the development of the original LP400 S, which while outwardly similar, the LP500 S had a 4.8L V12, which produced 375 bhp and had a top speed of 160 mph. Production started in 1982 and 321 total LP500 S models were produced.
Model by ALTAYA 1/43
2004 Lamborghini Murcielago: Lamborghini's flagship model until 2010, the Murci'elago is an all-wheel drive, mid-engine sports car. Sporting a 6.5L V12 engine, it is capable of 211 mph and a night in jail for trying to prove it! This is the first modern Lambo design that I like, less angular and severe in appearance.
Model by AUTOART 1/43

2006 Lamborghini Gallardo: The Gallardo has been Lamborghini's most produced model with over 10,000 units made between 2001-2011. For 2006, the Gallardo underwent several changes to the exhaust,steering, suspension, gearing, but also, the 5.0L V-12 engine power was increased to 513 hp. The result was a much improved car; it handled and turned better, sounded better under full throttle and the extra power and lower gearing made an already fast car into a much faster one. The Gallardo has a top speed of 200 mph.
Model by AUTOART 1/43

SPANISH RACING & PRODUCTION CARS

1952 Pegaso Z-102: Pegaso was a Spanish company know for its trucks and buses, but for a brief period, produced interesting sports cars. The Z-102 employed racing-car technology in its chassis and alloy body designed by Touring. Powered by a 3.2 litre DOHC V8 producing 360 hp with optional supercharger. With a top speed of 160 mph, the Z-102 was the world's fastest production car at the time.
Model by ALTAYA/IXO 1/43



To continue to another section of the Old Irish Racing Collection, select one of the following:

THE SIGNATURE PROJECT & RACING DIORAMAS

RACING SUPPORT VEHICLES, TRANSPORTERS & OTHER TRUCKS

JAGUAR RACING CARS:
1950's
1960 - 1979
1980 - 1989
1990's - Present

JAGUAR AT LE MANS

JAGUAR AUTOMOBILIA

JAGUAR PRODUCTION CARS:
PRE-WAR to 1959
1960 to 1968
1969-1987
1988 - Present

JAGUAR CONCEPT CARS

EACH JAGUAR MODEL FROM 1935 IN PRODUCTION ORDER

FERRARI RACING CARS:
1949 - 1959
1960 - 1969
1970 - 1979
1980 - Current

FERRARI FORMULA ONE

FERRARI PRODUCTION CARS

PORSCHE RACING & PRODUCTION CARS:
1950's & 60's
1970's
1980's
1990 - Current

BRUMOS RACING TEAM
PORSCHE PRODUCTION CARS

FORMULA 1, GRAND PRIX, INDY:
1900 - 1959
1960 - 1969
1970 - 1979
1980 - PRESENT

THE TRIPLE CROWN OF ENDURANCE RACES:
THE 24 HOURS of LE MANS 1923-2020
THE 12 Hours of SEBRING WINNERS
THE 24 HOURS of DAYTONA WINNERS

GREAT AUTOMOTIVE MAKES & RACING TEAMS:
ABARTH
ALFA ROMEO
ASTON MARTIN
AUDI
AUSTIN HEALEY & HEALEY
BMW
CHAPARRAL
CHEVROLET & GM POWER
CUNNINGHAM
DATSUN/NISSAN
ECURIE ECOSSE
FORD POWER: GT40's, MUSTANGS, MIRAGE & MORE
SHELBY -FORD'S: COBRAS, DAYTONAS, GT40's & MUSTANGS
GROUP 44, Inc.
LANCIA
LOLA SPORTS CARS
LOTUS
McLAREN
MASERATI
MERCEDES BENZ
MG CARS
TOYOTA
TRIUMPH

MISC. RACING AND PRODUCTION CARS BY COUNTRY OF ORIGIN
AMERICAN, ASIAN, AUSTRALIAN
BRITISH
FRENCH
GERMAN & SWEDISH
ITALIAN & SPANISH
JAPANESE
LAND SPEED RECORD CARS
VETERAN, CLASSIC & SPECIAL INTEREST CARS

DRIVER TRIBUTES:
THE OLD IRISH RACING HALL OF FAME
JUAN MANUEL FANGIO TRIBUTE
STIRLING MOSS TRIBUTE
WORLD DRIVER & CONSTRUCTORS CHAMPIONS 1950 - 1985

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