I have always had a fondness for Alfa Romeo and appreciate the marque for its rich history of producing some of the best looking and technically interesting racing, sports cars and GT's ever made. While I have come close to purchasing one on a number of occasions, ownership of all but these miniatures has so far alluded me. As you can tell, I have a desire for the Giulia Sprint GTV and GTA's. Someday!

Pre-War
1930 6C 1750 GS: Tazio Nuvolari won the 1930 Mille Miglia in this car. Having started after his team-mate and rival Achille Varzi, Nuvolari was comfortably leading the race but was still behind Varzi on the road. In the early dawn Nuvolari tailed Varzi with his headlights off. Not being visible, he overtook Varzi on the straight roads approaching the finish at Brescia.
Model by METRO 1/43
1931 8C 2300 LM (LE MANS WINNER): Lord Howe and Sir Tim Birkin (from Bentley fame) drove Howe's 8C 2300 LM to victory at Le Mans in 1931. It would be the first of four consecutive victories for Alfa Romeo with the 8C 2300 LM. The '8C 2300 tipo Le Mans' was doing in sports car racing what the 8C 2300 was doing in Monoposto racing, winning!
Model by METRO 1/43
1932 6C 1750: This is the touring car version of the 1750 roadsters. With its supercharged performance, and elegant coachwork, the 1750 could be described as the ancestor of every GT car ever made. All 6C 1750's had a 1752 cc, 6-cyl. super-charged, producing a whopping 95 hp for its time. Certainly beats a '32 Chevy in looks and performance!
Model by RIO 1/43

1932 8C 2300 Spider Corsa: Borzacchini and Bignami drove to a victory at the 1932 Mille Miglia, 2.3 L (2336 cc) Vitorio Jano designed supercharged straight eight engine, 165 hp produced the ultimate sports car of its day. Nuvolari drove to victory in the Targa Florio twice in one of these cars (1931 & 32) making three victories there in a row!.
Model by BRUMM 1/43
1932 8C 2300 LM (LE MANS WINNER): Raymond Sommer and Luigi Chinetti drove to a victory at Le Mans, to cap a great year for Alfa in 1932, with wins in the Mille Miglia, Targa Florio and Italian GP. This car entered by Sommer, beat the factory team car at Le Mans, which finished second. Sommer drove for over 20 hours of the race after Chinetti fell ill and could not race.
Model by IXO 1/43
1932 P3: The Alfa Romeo P3, or Tipo B was designed by Vittorio Jano,based on the Alfa Romeo 8C. Designed to last longer race distances than its predessor the P2, the P3 was the first single seat grand prix car. The P3 was powered by a 2.7L straight-eight cylinder, super-charged engine. Tazio Nuvolari drove the P3 to victory in its first race, the Italian GP at Monza in 1932 and won the championship for Alfa that year.
Model by RIO 1/43
1936 Alfa Romeo Tipo C (12C-36) : The 12C-36 made its debut at the Tripoli Grand Prix, fitted with the new V12 instead of the 3.8 litre straight-eight of the 8C-35. The supercharged 4.1L V12 engine produced 370 bhp. Designed to compete with the might of the German Silver Arrows of Mercedes and Auto Union, the Alfa was competitive, but scored victory in only two major Grand Prix races in 1936, the Vanderbuilt Cup and at Barcelona. This is the car that Tazio Nulovari drove to victory at the Vanderbuilt Cup races.
Model by FDS 1/43

1937 8C 2900B Spyder: WThe 2900B used a twin-supercharged 2.9L straight-eight cylinder engine (180 HP/120 MPH), which sat behind the front axle for better weight distribution. Intended for racing, the 2900B The 2900B design made some concessions to comfort and reliability, but arrival in one of the most beautiful cars of its time must have been worth it! It was also one of the worlds fastest cars at the time, adding to its appeal.
Model by Metal 43 1/43
1938 8C 2900B Le Mans Speciale: Raymond Sommer set fastest lap at Le Mans in 1938 in this car. Unfortunately, after 219 laps, the ride he shared with Clemente Biondetti came to an end due to a punctured tire and over-reved engine. Alfa Corse commissioned this striking aerodynamic coupe built by Touring, which sets this special streamlined car apart from the other 2900B's.
Model by M4 1/43
1938 8C 2900B Touring Spyder: One of the most elegant and proven supercars to arise out of the 1930s was the 2900B. It was Alfa Romeo's most prestigious grand touring car and was based on their successful motor sport engineering. Touring of Milan was responsible for almost the entire production of 2900B bodies and his flowing designs on the 2900B were his masterworks.Engine is a twin-supercharged, 180 hp, 2.9L.
Model by ALTAYA/IXO 1/43
1939 6C 2500S: Introduced in 1938, the 2500 (2.5L six-cylinder) was the last 6C road car, with the last 6C being produced in 1952. It was replaced by the 1900. The "S" stands for Sport and this car is an early Pinninfarina Cabriolet fitted on a Sport chassis. Breaking with the tradition of delivering rolling chassis for coachbuilders to body, the Pinninfarina Sport Cabriolet was offered as a complete car by Alfa Romeo.
Model by ALTAYA/IXO 1/43

Pre-War Replicas
1968 Spider 4R Zagato Quattroroute: It could be described as a factory kit car, or a modern reminiscence of a prewar Alfa jewel, the 6C 1750 from the 30's. Based on the Giulia floor plan and mechanicals, it sports a body built by Zagato in the old manner. Only 92 were produced from 1966 to 1968.
Model by POLITOYS 1/43
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1968 Spider 4R Zagato Quattroroute: These are the two color variations this model came in. It was unique in its day as being the only diecast car with working rack and pinion steering, especially in 1/43 scale!
Model by POLITOYS 1/43

The 1950's
1950 158 Alfetta: Giuseppe Farina piloted this car to victory at the 1950 GP of Britain on his way to becoming the first Drivers World Champion. The 158 was powered by a super-charged, eight-cylinder-in-line 1.5-litre engine that pumped out around 370bhp. These cars dominated F1 racing after the war. Fangio joined the Alfa team in 1950.
Model by BRUMM 1/43
1951 159M Alfetta: Juan Manuel Fangio won the 1951 World Drivers Championship, his first of five. Fangio won Championships driving for Alfa Romeo, Ferrari, Mercedes and Maserati. Considering that when he came to Grand Prix racing at the age of 37 in 1948, one can only speculate how many other championship titles may have been his had war not interrupted racing for so long.
Model by MINICHAMPS 1/43
1951 159M Alfetta: The great Fangio took first place at 1951 Spanish GP, the last race for the 159, beating Ascari in his Ferrari for the World Championship. The 159 was the successor to the 158 and continued Alfa's F1 domination. Having won the race and the championship with a thirteen-year old car stretched to its utter limits, Alfa Romeo rightfully decided to call it quits.
Model by MEBETOYS 1/24

1951 159M Alfetta: I built this model for a friends collection, replicating the 1951 Spanish GP winner at the hands of Juan Manuel Fangio. I was going for the "as raced" look and think that these photos show a patena of a Grand Prix car of the day that had seen a lot of racing action.
Model by REVIVAL 1/20
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1950 6C 2500 Villa d'Este: Introduced in 1938, the 2500 (2443 cc) was the last 6C road car and was produced again after the war until 1952. The classic Villa d'Este version of the 6C 2500 introduced in 1949 was named after its triumph in the concours d'elegance of the same name and is a perfect example of how the lines of a truly successful car are timeless. Villa d'Este was Alfa's last hand built model, only 36 examples were made.
Model by METRO 1/43
1951 1900 Sprint: The 1900 was offered in two door or four door models, with a new 1884 cc, 90 bhp, 4 cylinder twin cam engine. It was spacious and simple, yet quick and sporty. The 1900TI with a more powerful 100 bhp engine, had bigger valves, compression ratio was higher and it had double carburetor and a top speed of 106 mph. The slogan Alfa used when selling it was "The family car that wins races", not-so-subtly alluding to the car's success in the Targa Florio and other competitions.
Model by M4 1/43
1953 C52 Disco Volante: The aerodynamic Disco Volante, or "flying saucer" was a revolutionary styling exercise by Touring that they built both spyder and coupe versions built upon the 1900 mechanicals, but using a tubular space frame chassis. A car was entered at Le Mans for Juan Manuel Fangio and Froilan Gonzales to drive, but the Alfa entry never showed up, with no explanation ever given. Subsequently, none of the three Disco Volantes were ever raced
Model by M4 1/43
1954 B.A.T. 7: Franco Scaglione at Bertone designed three Berlinetta Aerodinamica Tecnica (BAT) concept cars for Alfa Romeo to test low aerodynamic drag theories. Built over three years, they were displayed at the Turin Auto Show in 1953, 1954 and 1955 and all had jet age styling influences. The BAT 7 was the second of the three cars, built in 1954, it was based on an Alfa Romeo 1900 chassis with a 2.0L four-cyl. engine of 90 hp and capable of 125 mph. The car was raced once by Ray McLaughlin in a SCCA National race at Glendale in 1955. He finished 9th overall and 5th in class. McLaughlin had cut part of the rear wings off for greater visibility.
Model by BIZARRE 1/43

1954 1900 TI: Entered for the Carrera Panamericana in 1954, this 1900 driven by Sergio Mantovani and Bruno Chiappa placed 18th overall. Alfa Romeo entered this car as a works entry, and closely supported a brace of 1900's in the race, competing for the European Touringt Class of 1900 cc, in which this car placed 2nd to another Alfa.
Model by BRUMM 1/43
1954 1900 SS Zagato: Giovanni Rota and Luigi Martelli drove this car in the 1955 Mille Miglia. A sister car finished 7th in class, beaten by both Mercedes 300 SL and Aston Martin DB2's. Probably the most sought after versions of the 1900 are the Zagato bodied Super Sprints. These were raced with great success against the two litre Ferraris and Lancias of the day.
Model by METRO 1/43
1956 Giulietta Spider Veloce: The Alfa Romeo Giulietta was manufactured by Alfa Romeo from 1954 to 1965. The first Giulietta model was a coupé, the Giulietta Sprint, introduced in late 1954. This was followed by a sedan in spring 1955 and in mid 1955, the open two-seat Giulietta Spyder, featuring convertible bodywork by Pininfarina. Consalvo Sanesi drove this car in the 1956 Mille Miglia, but failed to finish.
Model by METRO 1/43

1957 Giulietta Sprint: The first Giulietta model was the Giulietta Sprint, introduced in late 1954. The Giulietta used an Alfa Romeo Twin Cam engine of 1290 cc straight-4, with a light alloy cylinder block and an alloy cylinder head with twin overhead camshafts. The engine produced a power output of 80 bhp.
Model by SOLIDO 1/43
1957 Giulietta Berlina TI: The Giulietta used a dual overhead cam, four cylinder engine of 1290cc capacity. On the TI this engine was tuned so that the car could reach nearly 100mph. Lucky was the salesman that had this for his company car, selling Abarth exhaust systems to the specialist garages in Italy. Nice company car!
Model by RIO 1/43
1957 Giulietta Sprint Speciale: The Sprint Speciale (SS) was offered as a more luxurious Giulietta that was made with light weight construction and competition in mind. Powered by a 1750cc DOHC 4-cyl. engine producing 125 bhp, the SS was capable of a top speed of 120 mph. In 1957, this car was driven to first in its class on the Targa Florio driven by Riolo and Frederico.
Model by M4 1/43

The 1960's
1962 2600 Sprint: In 1962 Alfa Romeo introduced a new six cylinder coupe based on the new 2600 Saloon and Spider, the 2600 Sprint. Powering the new coupe was Alfa Romeo's new alloy 2584cc, twin overhead cam, six cylinder unit. The 2.6 litre engine came with triple carburetors and produced over 145bhp and could do up to 130 mph. This car was driven by Moreno Balidi to a class win at the famous Bologna-della Raticosa hill climb. Not too bad for a big heavy car that was never designed for competition.
Model by M4 1/43
1963 Giulietta SZ: The Sprint Zagato (SZ) was a race version Giulietta that was specially prepared by Zagato, although designed by Bertone. Using the Giulietta convertible chassis and 1.3L 4-Cyl. Engine from the Sprint Veloce, the aluminium bodied SZ was good for 120 mph. This car is a 'coda tronca' or long tail and was one of the last 30 of the 200 SZ's built. It ran at Le Mans in 1963 with Giampiero Biscaldi and Sergio Pedretti driving for Scuderia St. Ambroeus. It was DQ for taking on oil too soon.
Model by M4 1/43
1964 Giulia TZ: Tubolare Zagato (TZ) with a radical tubular space frame chassis and lightweight Zagato body, was a purpose built race car designed to replace the SZ. Jean Rolland driving with Gabriel Augias, took first place overall on the 1964 Coupe des Alpes (Alpine) Rally in this car. Rolland drove this car extensively to many rally victories between 1964-1966.
Model by ALTAYA/IXO 1/43

1964 Giulia TZ: This entry at Le Mans in 1964 by Scuderia St. Ambroeus finished 13th overall and 1st in the under 1600 cc class. It was driven by Roberto Bussinello and Bruno Deserti, who broke a class distance record set by Porsche in 1958. The Scuderia based in Italy fielded three entries at Le Mans in 1964 for the factory and the then new Autodelta competition arm of Alfa. The sister car to this entry finished 15th overall and 2nd in class.
Model by BEST 1/43
1964 Giulia TZ: Lucien Bianchi and Jean Rolland finished in 7th place, 1st in Class in the 1965 Targa Florio. The TZ was powered by 1.6L twin cam engine and other mechanical components shared with the Alfa Romeo Giulia. A purpose built sports racing car, with a tubular space frame chassis, light all-aluminum bodywork, disc brakes and independent suspension. The result was a lightweight coupé with a top speed of 134 mph.
Model by BEST 1/43
1964 Giulia TZ: Fernand Masoreo and Jean Rolland, private entry of Scuderia St. Ambroeus did not finish the 1964 Le Mans due to an accident. The TZ was actively raced by many privateers, as well as Autodelta, Alfa's racing arm. The twin plug head from the TZ would also be used in the GTA. Scuderia St. Ambroeus was a regular Alfa entrant at endurance races such as Le Mans and the Targa Florio.
Model by BEST 1/43

1965 Alfa Romeo 1600 GTA: One of the early GTA's, this one was raced to a win at the Coppa Carri Race at Monza in the hands Carlo Benelli in 1967. One of the many cup races which Alfa featured predominantly in over the mid-60's raced by both Autodelta and privateers. This is one of my favorite livery combinations on a GTA and believe it is an Autodelta entered car.
Model by M4 1/43
1966 Alfa Romeo Duetto Spider: Based on the Giulia 105 series chassis, the Duetto Spider was launched in the 36th Geneva Motor Show in 1966. With a body designed by Pininfarina, it was powered by a 1570 cc variant of the Alfa Romeo twin cam four cylinder engine, and produced 109 hp. With a beautiful body, respectable performance and thoroughbred handling. the Duetto is all that's right with fine Italian sports cars.
Model by EDISON 1/43
1967 1750 Berlina: The Berlina sedan was introduced in 1967, together with the 1750 GTV coupe and 2000 Spider. The 1750 was meant to be the top of the sedan range, the sedan's body shape, designed by Bertone, resembled the Giulia it replaced, but with some of that vehicle's distinctive creases smoothed out, and with significant changes to the trim details. Powered by a 1.8L engine, which produced 116 hp, for USA markets the 1750 was equipped with SPICA fuel injection, instead of twin side-draught carburetors.
Model by STARLINE 1/43

The GTV's, GTA's and GTAm's
1965 Giulia Sprint GTA: Produced from 1965 to 1971, the GTA was made primarily for Group 2 racing. Autodelta, the racing division of Alfa, developed a car for competition that closely resembled to the road going model. These cars were named GTA instead of GT, the 'A' standing for "Alleggerita", Italian for lightweight.
Model by TAMIYA 1/10
1966 Giulia Sprint GTA: Autodelta supplied private teams such as Monzeglio EC Squadra Corse with cars to compete in events across Europe and in the USA. This car was driven by Cesare Poretti and Gianpaolo Benedini to 3rd place in class (22nd OA) in the 1970 Targa Florio. An early Autodelta campaigned GTA.
Model by PROGETTO K 1/43
1966 Giulia Sprint GTA: An early Autodelta campaigned GTA. Produced from 1965 to 1971, the GTA was made primarily for Group 2 racing. Autodelta, the racing division of Alfa, developed a car for competition that closely resembled to the road going model. The GTA automobiles were manufactured in either street (Stradale) or pure race (Corsa) trim. The GTA had aluminium panels instead of steel.
Model by PROGETTO K 1/43

1965 Giulia GTC: With a total production run of 1,000 units between 1965, when it was launched at the Geneva Salon, and 1966, the Giulia GTC Alfa was an exclusive 2+2 convertible derivative of the Bertone Giulia Sprint GT coupe.
Model by PROGETTO K 1/43
1965 Giulia GTC: Top down fun! Perfect in red. The convertible conversion was carried out by Carrozzeria Touring and the GTC was one of the last cars to be built by Touring.
Model by SCHUCO 1/43
1965 Guilia Sprint GTA 1600: Autodelta prepared for Jolly Club a GTA for the 1965 season, the first racing season for the then new GTA. This car was entered in the Jolly Hotels Rallye in Italy and finished 3rd overall, 1st in class with Roberto Bussinello & Riccardo di Bona.
Model by M4 1/43

1966 Giulia Sprint GTA: Another privateer entry of a Corsa model in the livery of Squadra Angelini raced at Vallelunga in 1967 by Ignazio Giunti who went on to drive for Ferrari in 1970, winning at Sebring.
Model by PROGETTO K 1/43
1966 Giulia Sprint GTA: Stradale version of the GTA.
Model by ROAD SIGNATURE 1/18
1967 Giulia Sprint GTA: An Autodelta entry driven by Ignazio Giunti at Monza in 1967.
Model by PROGETTO K 1/43
1967 Giulia Sprint GTA: Horst Kwech ran this GTA in the Trans-AM series under his Ausca Racing Team banner. He had four class wins that season as Alfa battled n the 2.0 under division to repeat as Champions, but lost the Manufacturers Championship to Porsche.
Model by PROGETTO K 1/43

1968 Giulia Sprint GTA SA: Only ten examples of the supercharged SA were built. Using the 1.6L four-cylinder twinspark engine with two superchargers, it could produce up to 250 hp. Built for Group 5 racing in Europe, it was raced at the Daytona 24 Hours in 1968 by Autodelta as Daytona was the first round of the World Championship of makes. Leo Cella, Teodoro Zeccoli and Giampiero Biscaldi drove to a 20th place finish overall and sixth in class.
Model by PROGETTO K 1/43
1970 2000 GTAm: Produced in 1970-71, the 200 GTAm delivered up to 237 hp in the 2000 cc version Unlike the GTA, the GTAm derived from the GTV 1750, the GTAm was created in 1968 with the base being a GTV 1750 with SPICA fuel injection. The 1750 (actually 1779 cc) was bored to 1985 cc to meet the 2000 cc limitation of its class to the maximum. the "m" stands for "maggiorata" or enlarged. The GTAm was raced successfully in the early TransAm series in the under 2 liter class.
Model by PROGETTO K 1/43
1970 Giulia Sprint GTA: GTA's also were successful in the rally world. This car competed in the Monte Carlo Rally.
Model by PROGETTO K 1/43
1970 Giulia Sprint GTA: This Autodelta 2000 GTV was sponsored by the Martini Racing Team and is one of the many Alfa's the team has campaigned over the years. Unfortunately, Roger Dubos lost his life drivng this car at the Spa 24 hrs round of the ETCC in 1973. In the 7th hour he was unable to avoid a wrecked BMW. The Autodelta team withdrew the remaining cars from the race out of mourning and respect.
Model by PROGETTO K 1/43

1968 1300 GTAJ: The smaller displacement 1300cc "Junior" engine that was based on the 1600, but with a short stroke crankshaft powered the 450 GTA Juniors were produced. The Stradale version such as this one, did not have many of the same lightweight features of the cars destined exclusively for the race track.
Model by PROGETTO K 1/43
1970 1750 GTAm: Toine Hezemans won the first of two consecutive Monza 4 hour races in 1970 in this car. Both the 1750 and 2000 GTAm's won hundreds of races before competition grew stronger in 1971. But the Giulia sometimes kept up with much bigger engined cars such as the 3 litre BMW CSL. Wish I would have bought one when I could have!
Model by M4 1/43
1970 2000 GTAm: While in America the Alfa GTAm cars were fighting it out in the Trans Am series with Datsun and Porsche; in Europe they also contested with BMW in sedan racing. Alfa took the top two spots at the Zandvoort Trophy race in 1970, with this car of Rob Slotemaker of Racing Team Transavia Holland placing 5th behind two BMW 2000 TI's.
Model by M4 1/43
1971 2000 GTAm: The 2000 GTAm was powered by a 2.0L DOHC engine producing 237 hp. Toine Hezemans and Carlo Facetti finished 3rd overall and 1st in class at the 24 heures de Francorchamps at Spa in 1971 in this car. Its sister car in the Autodelta team finished in 5th place. Alfa Romeo won the ETTC Championship.
Model by M4 1/43

1971 2000 GTAm: Autodelta prepared and driven by Toine Hezemans in the 1971 Monza 4-hour to a 1st Place finish. Hezemans was the European Touring Car Championship (ETCC) champion in 1970, Alfa the Champions in 1971 & 1972.
Model by FLY 1/32
1971 2000 GTAm: Toine Hezemans was successful at the 1971 Zandvoort ETCC race with a 1st in class and 4th OA. Chassis #1530952 was a very successful car with wins in the 24 hour Francorchamps, 4-hour Jarama, 4-hour Monza and was raced through 1973.
Model by PROGETTO K 1/43
1972 1300 GTA Junior: This car was raced at the Jarama 4-hour, a round of the European 2-Litre Sports Car Championship for Makes in 1972. This car was driven to 7th place (3rd in class) by Colzani "Pooky"Venturi.
Model by FLY 1/32

1966 Giulia TZ2: Autodelta campaigned this car during the 1966 season, beginning at Sebring where it finished 14th and 1st in class. It was raced at Targa Florio, Monza Spa and finally at the Nurburgring 1000 Km where it placed 13th and 1st in class with Lucien Bianchi and Herbert Schultze driving. The 1.6L four-cyl. engine of the TZ2 produced 170 bhp, good for 152 mph.
Model by Alfa Romeo Collection 1/43
1967 T33 : With a completely new 2.0L V8 designed by Autodelta and mated to a Colotti 6-speed gearbox, the 33 made its debut in 1967. The first four 33's are easily distinguishable from later models because of the airbox style intake, which also gave it is 'Pericopica' nick-name. This car was raced at the Targa Florio by Andrea de Adamich and Jean Rolland, but did not finish due to suspension problems.
Model by M4 1/43
1967 T33 Stradale: The Alfa Romeo Tipo 33 (T33) was a sports racing prototype raced by the Alfa Romeo factory-backed team between 1967 and 1977. The different T33 variants took part in the Sport Cars World Championship, Interserie and Can-Am series. The 2000 cc (122ci) Tipo 33 mid-engined prototype debuted on 12 March 1967.
Model by M4 1/43

Alfa Romeo at Le Mans
1967 T33 Fléron: Shortly after the winning debut of the T33 at the Fléron hill climb in Belgium with Teodoro Zeccoli at the wheel, he teamed up with Andrea de Adamich at Sebring. The car retired with suspension problems. The original T33 proved unreliable and uncompetitive in the 1967 World Sportscar Championship.
Model by M4 1/43
1968 T33B/2 Coda Lunga: Coda Lunga means "long tail" and like other makes, Alfa discovered that a longer tail was beneficial at high speed circuits such as Le Mans. Ignazio Giunti and Giovanni 'Nanni' Galli drove to 4th place overall and 1st in the 2.0L prototype class at Le Mans in 1968.
Model by METRO 1/43
1968 T33B/2 Coda Lunga: Serge Trosch and Freiherr Karl von Wendt drove this entry for VDS racing at Le Mans in 1968. They retired after two hours due to engine failure. In competition trim the quad-cam 2.0L V8 was good for at least 270 bhp and 186 mph.
Model by M4 1/43
1968 T33B/2 Coda Lunga: Nino Vaccarella and Giancarlo Baghetti drove one of four Autodelta factory entry at Le Mans in 1968. They were eliminated in the 12th hour due to fuel pump failure. Autodelta, the motorsports arm on Alfa Romeo, originally was designed to used a 2.5L fuel-injected, aluminum V8 capable of producing 260bhp in the T33B. Carlo Chitti saw an opportunity in the 2.0L class, so for Le Mans, the engine size was reduced to 2.0L, but the power increased to 270 bhp.
Model by BEST 1/43

1968 T33/2 Daytona: Mario Andretti and Lucien Bianchi drove to 6th place finish at 1968 Daytona in Chassis #75033-15. These are beautiful race cars powered by 1995 cc V8's producing 270 bhp, named Daytona for their success there. They set the stage for the world beating T33 cars yet to come.
Model by BEST 1/43
1968 T33B/2 Coda Lunga: Autodelta entered four T33B/2's at Le Mans in 1968. This one driven by Carlo Facetti and Spartaco Dini finished 5th overall and second in class. The fourth Autodelta entry went out of the race at the 12th hour with fuel pump failure.
Model by TOP MODEL 1/43
1968 T33B/2 Coda Lunga: Mario Casoni and Giampiero Biscaldi finished Le Mans in 1968 in sixth position and third in class behind the two other team cars entered by Autodelta which finished in fourth and fifth positions. This 4-5-6 finish was the best Alfa Romeo and Autodelta would do in the modern era at Le Mans.
Model by TOP MODEL 1/43
1968 T33B/2 Coda Lunga: Count Rudi van der Straten's Racing Team VDS entered two T33B's at Le Mans in 1968. Both cars were prepared by Autodelta and shared the new uprated engines, six speed gearbox and titanium chassis as the works car. Like the other VDS entry, this one driven by Teddy Pilette and Rob Slotemaker suffered engine failure, ending their race in the 9th hour.
Model by BEST 1/43

1970 T33/3 Coda Lunga: After an absence in 1969, the Autodelta team was back at Le Mans in 1970. This car driven by Nanni Galli and Rolf Stommelen was disqualified after receiving an illegal push start. Le Mans in 1970 was dominated by Porsche and the 917 in the 5.0L class. Alfa's fortunes would improve for 1971.
Model by M4 1/43
1970 T33/3 Coda Lunga: The T33/3 made its debut at the 1969 12 Hours of Sebring. The V8 engine was enlarged from the T33/2 to 3.0L, producing 400 hp, which put the 33/3 in the same class as the Porsche 908 and the Ferrari 312P. Teodoro Zeccoli and Carlo Facetti drove this car in the 1970 Le Mans but DNF'd due to an accident.
Model by TSM 1/43
1970 T33/3 Coda Lunga: Andrea de Adamich and Piers Courage drove this car at Le Mans in 1970. Part of the Autodelta entry of four 3.0L cars, this entry was eliminated in the 20th hour due to piston failure. It was not a great Le Mans for Alfa with all four cars retiring (only 7 cars finished the race in 1970).
Model by M4 1/43

1970 T33/3 Coda Lunga: The fourth Autodelta team car at Le Mans in 1970, unfortunately for drivers Toine Hezemans and Maston Gregory, they would be the first car out of the race in the second hour due to a holed piston. Four DNF's, a disappointing end to Alfa's 1970 effort.
Model by M4 1/43
1971 T33/3: Andrea de Adamich and Gijs van Lennep took 2nd place in the 1971 Targa Florio behind another Autodelta team car. This is the short tailed version of the 33/3, used when aerodynamics for the long straights at Le Mans were not needed.
Model by M4 1/43
1971 T33/3: Scooter Patrick drove this Otto Zipper sponsored car in the 1972 Can Am at Leguna Seca for 7th place. In T33/3 was up against stiff competition in the Porsche 917 which would soon dominate everything and the 33/3's star was declining.
Model by SLOT.IT 1/32

1971 T33/3: Amidst rising competition, 1971 was still a great year for Alfa. DeAdamich and Pescarolo drove this car to 3rd place at the 1971 Sebring 12 hour. Its Autodelta sister car finished 2nd.
Model by SLOT.IT 1/32
1971 T33/3: This car was a private entry by Giovanni Alberti in the 1972 Buenos Aires 1000 Km, where teamed with Carlo Facetti they finished third. Alberti sponsored Alfa entries on a periodic basis.
Model by M4 1/43
1972 T33/3: Nanni Galli and Helmut Marko finished 2nd overall at the 1972 Targa Florio behind the Ferrari 312PB in the Autodelta entry. Its sister car finished 3rd.
Model by EDISON 1/43

1972 33TT3: In 1972, with a talented slate of drivers, Autodelta fielded three cars at Le Mans. This car driven by Vic Elford and Helmut Marko lasted until the 20th hour when it lost its clutch, a disappointing end.
Model by M4 1/43
1972 33TT3: Andrea de Adamich and Nino Vaccarella finished 4th behind two Matra Simcas and a Porsche 908 at Le Mans in 1972. The next five places were taken by Ferrari Daytonas. The GT cars were catching up to the 3.0L prototypes at Le Mans in terms of power and speed.
Model by M4 1/43
1972 33TT3: At Le Mans in 1972, Rolf Stommelen and Nanni Galli retired after 19 hours due to gearbox issues. The 'TT' meant Tellaio Tubulare - meaning tubular chassis for the vehicles space frame type chassis.
Model by M4 1/43

The 1970's, 80's and 90's
1973 33TT12: 1973 saw the introduction of the Telaio Tubolare (tubular chassis) which has a Carlo Chiti-designed 12 cylinder 3.0L flat engine (500 bhp). This car appeared at the 1974 Le Mans test (2nd) & 4 Hr race (1st), But did not arrive at the 24hr.
Model by BRUMM 1/43
1975 33TT12: 1975 Watkins Glen - 2nd place driven by Arturo Merzario and Mario Andretti. In 1975 when after years of trying Alfa Romeo won the sport cars world championship. The season was almost total domination, seven wins in eight races.
Model by METRO 1/43
1975 33TT12: 1975 Spa 1000km, driven by Derick Bell and Henri Pescarolo to first place, entered by the Willi Kauhsen Racing, which was the quasi-factory team. Alfa Romeo repeated winning the World Sports Car Championship in 1976 with the T33SC12.
Model by BRUMM 1/43
1977 33SC12: As a successor of the 33TT12 in 1976, the 33SC12's, (SC referring for SCatolato a boxed chassis) 3.0 L flat-12 engine now produced 520 bhp. Alfa Romeo won again the sports car world championship in 1977, the SC12 winnin every race that season. This car was driven to victory at Monza by Vittorio Brambilla.
Model by METRO 1/43

1974 Montreal: Produced from 1970-77 the Montreal was first a concept car at the Montreal World's Fair in 1967. Powered by a 2593 cc 90° dry-sump lubricated V8 engine with SPICA fuel injection that produced around 200 bhp, coupled to a five-speed ZF gearbox and a limited-slip differential. This engine was derived from the V8 used in the T33 Stradale and in the T33/3 sports prototype racer.
Model by EDISON 1/43
1973 Montreal: Alfa Romeo Deutschland entered this Montreal in the 1973 Nurburgring 1000 km, owned and driven by Dieter Gleich along with Dieter Weizinger, where they failed to finish. The Montreal was powered by a dry-sump 2.6L V8 engine that was derived from the 2.0L V8 used in the Tipo 33 race cars. In race trim it was capable of 150 mph. The Montreal borrowed styling from the Lamborghini Miura and while not particulalry successful on the track, it was one of the best looking race cars in its day. A Montreal was raced in the Trans-Am and IMSA in 1973-74 by BobCor Racing, piloted by Bert Everett.
Model by M4 1/43
1981 179C F1: Alfa Romeo made a return to F1 as a constructor with the 177 in 1979. A newly designed 525 bhp 3.0L V12 engine debuted after 3 races and became the 179, which continued through the 1981 season. The 179 suffered from poor reliability and a rarely matched the speed of its competition. Bruno Giacomelli put this car on pole at the '80 USGP at Watkins Glen and placed 3rd at the '81 Caesars Palace Grand Prix.
Model by EDISON 1/43

The 1990's to Present
1995 155 V6 TI: This 155 was driven by former F1 pilot Alessandro Nannini in the 1995 DTM (German Touring Car Championship), where he finished 3rd overall in the 1996 ITC (International Touring Car) which replaced the DTM. Teammate to 1993 champion Nicola Larini, they were formidable competition in the 155's.
Model by ONYX 1/43
1996 155 V6 TI: Stefano Modena drove for Alfa Corse in the 1996 ITC, the last year for Alfa involvement. Powered by a four valve per cylinder V6 engine delivering some 480 bhp via a six speed sequential gearbox to a four wheel drive chassis, this car also boasted carbon-fibre body panels.
Model by ONYX 1/43
1996 155 V6 TI: The Alfa Romeo 155 V6 TI was first raced in 1993. With a top speed of 190 mph, the Alfa was a dominating force in touring car racing. This car driven by former F1 driver Stefano Modena in the ITC in 1995. The 155 scored 38 victories in DTM/ITC from 1993-96.
Model by ONYX 1/43

2007 8C Competizione : The Alfa Romeo Competizione was first presented as a concept car at the 2003 Frankfurt Motor Show. The name refers to the 8 Cylinder engine of 4.7L (8C) and Alfa Romeo's racing pedigree (Competizione, Italian for 'Competition'). The car was styled to hint at Alfa's of the 60's and 70's. The engine assembled by Ferrari, produces 444 hp and the car has a top speed of 181 mph. A total of 500 cars were built between 2007-2009.
Model by MODELRAMA 1/43


PLEASE NOTE: From 1968 into the 1990's tobacco companies sponsored many significant race cars. In the interest of historical accuracy, Old Irish Racing chooses to display models in our collection as historically accurate as possible. While seeing a tobacco advert on a car gives me no more desire to go smoke than seeing a car makes me want to go suck on its exhaust pipe. If tobacco (or alcohol) adverts on race cars offend you, please go look at nice pictures of bunnies and kittens on another site.

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JAGUAR:
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GREAT MARQUES:
ABARTH
ASTON MARTIN
ALFA ROMEO
AUSTIN HEALEY
BMW
CHAPARRAL
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THE GREAT GRAND PRIX, INDY & FORMULA 1 CARS 1960 - Present
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CAN-AM SERIES 1966 - 1974
IMSA SERIES 1971 - 1998
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THE GREAT SPORTS RACING CARS 1945 to PRESENT
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PRE-WAR CARS, SPECIAL INTEREST & CLASSICS

DIORAMAS FOR SALE

THE TRIPLE CROWN OF ENDURANCE RACES:
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GREAT RACING TEAMS:
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GULF OIL RACING
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GROUP 44, Inc.
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Legal stuff: Content and images on this website are the property of Old Irish Racing and may not be used without permission. © Old Irish Racing 2017

For copies of images, questions or comments about the collection to: OLD IRISH RACING

Back to: OLD IRISH RACING MODELS INDEX Home Page

Back to: OLD IRISH RACING Home Page

Member of International List of Scale Model Related Web Sites

Legal stuff: Content and images on this website are the property of Old Irish Racing and may not be used without permission. © Old Irish Racing 2016