JIM CLARK - WORLD CHAMPION

SPORTS & GT CARS

1959 Tojeiro-Jaguar: John (Toj) Tojeiro was a brilliant engineer and racing car designer, whose innovations helped to revolutionize race car design. Toj built the first of four Tojeiro-Jaguar's in 1956 in collaberation with Ecurie Ecosse. This is the fourth car which was designed to compete at Le Mans in 1959 where it retired. In its second race at the Goodwood TT, it was driven by a young Jim Clark and was crashed by co-driver Masten Gregory. For the TT, the car here was powered by a 3.8L Jaguar six-cylinder with fuel injection.
Model by PINKO 1/43
1959 Aston Martin DBR1/300: Jim Clark and Roy Salvadori finished 3rd at Le Mans in 1960 in the Border Reivers Team DBR1. These cars were initially fitted with a smaller 2.6L (2580 cc) Lagonda Straight-6 engine derived from the Aston Martin DB2 production car, even though the DBR1's predecessor, the DB3S, was at the time racing with a larger 2.9L (2922 cc) engine. Later DBR1s would feature the DBB-spec 2.9L DOHC 6 Cyl, rated at 195 hp.
Model by SMTS 1/43
1959 Lotus Elite (Mk 14): The Scotland based Border Reivers racing team entered this Elite for Sir John Whitmore and up and coming driver Jim Clark. One of several Elites entered, they finished in 10th position overall and 2nd in class behind another Elite. Powered by a Coventry Climax 1.2L all-aluminium straight-4 engine that produced 75hp, the light Elie was a serious sportscar conntender at Le Mans.
Model by IXO 1/43

1964 Lotus 30 S1: The Lotus 30 was Colin Chapman's first and only attempt at a Group 7/Can Am car. Powered by a 4.7L Ford V8 as used in the GT40. The car was fast when it held together, but was prone to chassis and suspension failure. Jim Clark bravely helped develop the 30 and did manage wins at Mallory Park and Goodwood in the 1964 & 1965 seasons respectively.
Model by SPARK 1/43
1965 Lotus 40: Putting an American V8 in a Bvritish chassis was not a new idea when the idea for the Lotus 30 was conceived. Cooper, Lister, Lola, & AC among others had done so with success, so why not Lotus? The Lotus 40 was a continuation of the Lotus 30, with a stronger chassis to accommodate a larger V8 engine. Using a Ford 5.7L, fuel injected engine producing 450 bhp, the big Lotus looked promising but could never quite deliver despite Jim Clark and Ritchie Ginthers' best efforts. Clark drove this car at the Guard Trophy at Brands Hatch in 1965, but Dnf due to a spin and subsequent damage.
Model by SPARK 1/43

FORMULA ONE & INDY

1960 Lotus-Climax 18: John Surtees and Innes Ireland were the Lotus team drivers for the 1960 season with Graham Hill having moved on to BRM. Clark joined the team mid-season as John Surtees departed to race motorcycles on the Isle of Man. Clark proved he was an up and coming champion, keeping his place in the team even after Surtees returned. Clark had his best 1960 F1 finish in this car at the Portugal GP, finishing 3rd.
Model by SPARK 1/43
1963 Lotus 25: At its peak, the Lotus 25 won 13 races, set 17 pole positions and 13 fastest laps. The 25 gave Jimmy Clark his first Grand Prix victory at Spa, and he won his World Championship in a 25 in 1963 and Lotus the constuctor's title.. This car is the '63 Italian GP winner. The 25 appeared in F1 into the 1965 season in the hands of private teams.
Model by BRUMM 1/43
1964 Lotus 25: Jim Clark was unable to repeat as World Champion in 1964, finishing third in the points. He fought a fierce season long battle with Graham Hill driving for BRM and John Surtees driving for Ferrari. The season came down to the final race, with Clark retiring on the final lap, allowing Hill & Surtees to pass him in the points race. This car is the one Clark drove to victory at Spa in the GP of Belgium.
Model by SPARK 1/43

1965 Lotus-Ford 38 Indianapolis 500 Winner: In 1965, Jim Clark drove the first mid-engined car to win the Indianapolis 500. Clark dominated the race, leading all but 10 laps of the 500 mile race. The Lotus 38 was an all monococoque aluminum chassis design, powered by a Ford 4.2L V8, which produced 500 hp. Clark would race the car again at Indy in 1966, finishing 2nd to Hill in the Lola-Ford
Model by SPARK 1/43
1965 Lotus 33 Climax WORLD CHAMPION & CONSTRUCTORS CHAMPION: The Lotus 33 was an improvement on the 25 chassis. The suspension was also modifies to accept wider tires introduced in the 1965 F1 season. The 1.5L Climax V8 was tuned to produce an additional 20 bhp, to bring the total to 220 bhp. Jim Clark won six races during the '65 season, setting fastest lap in all of them and starting from the pole position in five. He won the World Drivers Championship and Lotus the Constructors Championship.
Model by RBA 1/43
1967 Lotus 33/43: For the 1966 season, the engine formula was increased to 3.0L. Lotus did not have an engine and passed up Repco for a unproven H16 unit from BRM. The engine proved too heavy and made the car which was derived from the 33 and the 38 largely uncompetitive. Clark won the USGP in 1966 and Graham Hill drove an exceptional race to place 2nd at Monoco, the last race for this car before the introduction of the 49 and its Cosworth DFV engine. A new era had begun.
Model by SPARK 1/43

1967 Lotus 49: This is the car that Clark drove to victory at the '67 USGP at Watkins Glen, with Hill second. This 1-2 finish at the USGP in front of Ford brass was a great victory for Lotus and assured their preferential treatment in receiving the latest Cosworth engines. Sadly, Clark would lose his life in a racing accident early in the 1968 season. Jimmy Clark was World Champion driving for Lotus in 1963 & 65, certainly one of the best drivers ever.
Model by QUARTZO 1/18



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