Aston Martin Racing Cars:

1949 Aston Martin DB Mark II (DB2 prototype): Three prototype DB2's appeared at Le Mans in 1949. These prototypes were named the DB Mark II since they followed a small run of roadsters known as the 'Two Litre Sports' or DB1. This car featured the new 2.6L dual over-head cam six cylinder Lagonda engine. The DB2 featured a tube frame chassis and was a radical depature from the Aston model it replaced. Leslie Johnson and Charles Brackenbury drove this car at Le Mans, but retired with cooling problems early in the race.
Model by SPARK 1/43
1949 Aston Martin Mark II (DB2 prototype): Two of the prototype DB2's retained the four-cylinder 2.0L engine. The straight-6 engines was derived from Lagonda and designed by W.O. Bentley were unproven and only one car was given this engine, which lasted six laps. Of the three DB2 prototype cars entered at Le Mans, the two 2.0L cars were entered by private parties on Aston's behalf. This car was entered by Arthur Jones and co-driven with Jones by Nick Haines. The finished a respectable 7th and 3rd in Class.
Model by SPARK 1/43
1951 Aston Martin DB2 Vantage: Entered at Le Mans in 1951, this Aston entry driven by George Abecassis and Brian Shawe-Taylor finished 5th overall and second in class behind its sister car driven by Macklin and Thompson. The DB2 is one of my favorite Aston's. With its 2.6L DOHC straight-six producing 125 hp, the 411 DB2's produced were true continental touring cars of the first order!
Model by SPARK 1/43

1954 Aston Martin DB3S Coupe: For 1954, Aston Martin built two coupe bodied cars, believing that they would be more aerodynamic and therefore faster. The cars initial success at Silverstone gave hope to a good result at Le Mans. However, the cars proved to be unstable at top speed, with the rear-ends lifting at speed on the Mulsanne Straight. Prince B. Bira and Peter Collins drove this entry at Le Mans in 1954, with disaster striking in the 13th hour as the car had an accident and left the race. Aston Martin subsequently converted both cars to open-bodied cars.
Model by TOP MODEL 1/43
1955 Aston Martin DB3S: This car was driven by Roy Salvadori and Peter Walker at Le Mans in 1955, but failed to finish due to engine problems. Its sister car finished second, sandwiched between the Jaguars. The DB3Ss helped Aston Martin establish many international victories.A potent 2.9L car developing 240 hp, the DB3S set the stage for the great DBR1.
Model by TOP MODEL 1/43
1956 Aston Martin DB3S: Stirling Moss and Peter Collins drove this car at Le Mans in 1956, finishing second overall and first in class behind the winning Jaguar D-Type. By this time, Aston was was pulling 240 bhp out of its 2.9L six-cylinder engine. This is Chassis 9 of the 10 works team cars built from 1953-1956.
Model by PINKO 1/43
1959 Aston Martin DBR4: Aston Martin intended to capitalize on its sports car racing success in Formula One, launching the DBR4 in the 1959 season. The team made its debut at the Dutch GP, with cars for both Roy Salvadori and Carrol Shelby as drivers. The DBR4 was built on the DB3S sportscar chassis, and used that car's 2.4L straight-six engine. Unfortunately, the long time it took to develop the car meant that by the time it was ready, it was way behind the other cars on the F1 grid. The Aston team only entered four F1 races in 1959, the best finish for what is perhaps the most beautiful f1 car of the era, was a 6th place finish by Salvadori at the British GP.
Model by SMTS 1/43

1959 Aston Martin DBR1/300 (LE MANS WINNER): Carroll Shelby and Roy Salvadori drove to victory at Le Mans in 1959, a year that would see Aston Martin win the World Sports Car Championship at the final round at Goodwood. Another DBR1/300 took 2nd place at Le Mans that year, making the 1-2 sweep a dominant performance by Aston Martin.
Model by WESTERN 1/43
1959 Aston Martin DBR1/300: Finishing second to the winning DBR1 at Le Mans in 1959, Maurice Trintignant and Paul Frere were less than a lap down to the leaders at the finish. The Aston with its strong 3.0L six-cylinder DOHC engine, outlasted the faster Ferrari 250 TR59, which lead most of the race. The finish at Le Mans as well as wins at Nurburgring and Tourist Trophy ave Aston the '59 World Sportscar Championship.
Model by TOP MODEL 1/43
1959 Aston Martin DBR1/300: The team of Stirling Moss and Jack Fairman comprised the third David Brown factory entry at Le Mans in 1959. Their car had a slightly more pwerful engine (255 bhp) and Moss was instructed to set a fast pace in an attempt to break the Ferrari's. He was away first at the start and led the first lap and was in second place before a broken valve dropped the pair out of the race.
Model by IXO 1/43
1959 Aston Martin DBR1/300: Jim Clark and Roy Salvadori finished 3rd at Le Mans in 1960 in the Border Reivers Team DBR1. These cars were initially fitted with a smaller 2.6L (2580 cc) Lagonda Straight-6 engine derived from the Aston Martin DB2 production car, even though the DBR1's predecessor, the DB3S, was at the time racing with a larger 2.9L (2922 cc) engine. Later DBR1s would feature the DBB-spec 2.9L DOHC 6 Cyl, rated at 195 hp.
Model by SMTS 1/43

1959 Aston Martin DBR1/300: The DBR1 made its debut in 1956, with 1957 being the first season Aston contested for the championship with the new car. After the 1959 season, the company focused on F1 and the cars were sold to private entrants and raced with limited results up until the end of the 1962 season. The Le Mans winning car is Chassis #DBR1/2.
Model by IXO 1/43
1959 Aston Martin DBR1/300: This is not a faithful replica of the '59 Le Mans car, but is in earlier World Championship configuration(DBR2). The nose is wrong and the Le Mans cars had a clear tonneau among other modifications. However, without the rear spats, the lines on this car are fantastic and in my mind, are a close rival of the Jaguar D-type.
Model by SHELBY COLLECTIBLES 1/18
1959 Aston Martin DBR1/300: Aston purists will cringe at the color of green metallic on this car. For the 50th Anniversary of the Le Mans win, this is a limited production model and is 48 of 300 made for Shelby Automotive. It is for sale, inquire at reply@oldirish.com
Model by SHELBY COLLECTIBLES 1/18

1961 Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato: Jim Clark drove this car to victory at the Tourist Trophy at Goodwood in 1961. The GTZ was created by sending a DB4GT chassis to the Zagato factory in Milan to be clothed in the most beautiful lightweight bodies ever designed. Given an even more powerful 3670 cc engine than the standard GT, it produced 314bhp, with impressive performance with a top speed of 153mph.
Model by SMTS 1/43
1961 Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato: Lex Davison and Bib Stillwell raced this car at Le Mans in 1961. It and the other team car of John Ogier's Essex Racing Stable retired due to blown head gaskets. Roy Salvadori and Jim Clark both drove this car in competition during the cars brief career. 2 VEV was seriously damaged in 1962 during a crash at Spa
Model by VITESSE 1/43
1961 Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato: Jack Fairman and Bernard Consten drove the second Essex Racing Stables entry at Le Mans in 1961. Faulty head gaskets ruined the chances of either of the DB4 GT Zagato (or GTZ) cars from taking the GT 4.0 class, this car only completing 22 laps.
Model by ROAD SIGNATURE 1/18

1963 Aston Martin DP 214: Driven by Bill Kimberley and Jo Schlesser at Le Mans in '63, they retired in the 11th hour due to engine problems. The P214 is my favorite variation of the Zagato bodied Astons from that era. The other car driven by McLaren and Ireland suffered a similar fate. Irelland recorded a top speed of 187 mph down the Mulsane straight. Not bad for a 3.7L six! This si the only one of the two cars which survives.
Model by PINKO 1/43
1963 Aston Martin DP215: Using a DB4GT chassis, the DP215 was stylistically similar to the DP214, but had the advantage of not only being slightly lighter, but also using the larger 4.0L inline-6-cylinder engine even though the car was designed for a 5.0L V8 engine. Aston Martin entered the lone DP215 alongside the two DP214’s at Le Mans in 1963, with drivers Phil Hill and Lucien Bianchi. While being as high a 5th place, the transmission packed it in in the third hour, the torque of the engine too great for the older gearbox. The car still remains the fastest front end Aston Martin ever made, with Phil Hill setting a timed top-speed of 198.6 mph in practice.
Model by PINKO 1/43
1977 Aston Martin RHAM/1: RHAM/1 is a highly modified Aston Martin DBS V8 developed by Robin Hamilton for running at Le Mans. Powered by a 5.3L DOHC aluminum V8 with twin turbos, the RHAM/1 was capable of producing 600 bhp and a top speed of 190 mph. Entered in the 1977 and 79 Le Mans races with support from Aston Martin, the car was run in the GTP catagory in 1977, where it finished 17th overall and 3rd in class. In 1979, the car again competed in the GTP class and was lapping Le Mans faster than in 1977, with Mike Salmon and David Preece teamed with Hamilton. Due to an oil leak, their race was short as they retired the car on lap 21.
Model by GAMMA 1/43

1982 Aston Martin Nimrod NRA/C2: Nimrod Racing Automobiles was a partnership between Robin Hamilton and chairman of Aston Martin Lagonda, Victor Gauntlett. The project was intended to build sports prototypes for the World Sportscar Championship and IMSA GT Championship using Aston engines. Eric Broadley of Lola designed the chassis powered by a 5.3L V8. Tiff Needell, Bob Evans and Geoff Lees were put out of the race by an accident, the sister car finishing 7th in Group C.
Model by SPARK 1/43
1982 Aston Martin Nimrod NRA/C2: Ray Mallock, Simon Phillips and Mike Salmon drove the Viscount Downe - Pace Petroleum Racing entry at Le Mans in 1982. They finished 7th overall and 4th in class. The success theteam would have in the 1982 season helped Nimrod and Aston Martin take third place in the World Endurance Championship for Manufacturers. The Viscount Downe team was run by Richard Dawmey, son on the Viscount Downe, who was president of the Aston Martin Owners Club at the time.
Model by SPARK 1/43
1983 Aston Martin Nimrod NRA/C2B: Viscount Down Racing ran one of the five NRA/C2's built. At Le Mans in 1983 Mike Salmon, Ray Mallock and Steve Earle drove for VDR, but failed to finish due to engine failure in the 18th hour. Ray Mallock had redesigned the body work for the car, making it more aerodynamic and ascetically pleasing, hence the "B" designation. The car raced at Le Mans again in 1984 where it crashed in the 7th hour.
Model by ONYX 1/43
1983 EMKA C2 Aston Martin: EMKA Racing took over Aston Martin's Group C efforts in the World Endurance Championship in 1983 & 1984. Piloting this entry at Le Mans in 1983 were drivers Tiff Needell, car owner Steve O'Rourke and Nick Faure, finishing 17th. Their sister car (Nimrod) did not fininsh due to engine problems. Overall the Aston V8 powered cars were not successful, but earned Aston 3rd in the Makes Championship.
Model by BIZARRE 1/43

1989 Aston Martin AMR1: Aston Martin and Ecurie Ecosse partnered together under the name Protech to campaign in Group 6 prototype racing, build 5 chassis powered by 5.3L AM V8 engines which were subsequently enlarged to 6.0L and produced 600 hp. Brian Redman, Michael Roe and Costas Los drove Chassis#AMR1 02 to 11th place at Le Mans in 1989. The car was uncompetitive and by the end of the season, Protech was gone.
Model by SPARK 1/43
1989 Aston Martin AMR1: The second Ecurie Ecosse entry at Le Mans in 1989 was driven by David Leslie, Ray Mallock and David Spears. They exited the race in the 10th hour due to faulty electronics. After Le Mans, this car (Chassis #03) was only used for practice in select rounds of the World Prototype Championship in 1989.
Model by SPARK 1/43
2005 Aston Martin DBR9: Aston Martin Racing/Prodrive team at Le Mans in 2006 had Stephane Sarrazin, Pedro Lamy and Stephane Ortelli driving. They finished 10th overall and 5th in class behind three other DBR9's, a Corvette and Saleen. This car (Chassis #2), has been raced extensively at Sebring, Spa, Le Mans, American Le Mans series and continued racing up until 2011 in the FIA GT Championship.Stephane Ortelli.
Model by IXO 1/43
2005 Aston Martin DBR9: Based on the Aston Martin DB9 road car, the DBR9 retains the chassis, and the cylinder block and heads of the road car's 6.0L - V12 engine, producing 600 bhp. All the body panels are constructed from carbon fibre composite (except the roof) to minimize the weight of the car. This car (Chassis #1) was driven to 1st place in the GT1 class at Sebring in 1995, by David Brabham, D Turner and S Ortelli.
Model by IXO 1/43

2006 Aston Martin DBR9: Antonio Garcia & Richard Lyons drove this Team Modena car (Chassis # 101) to a 2nd in GT1 class, 9th OA at the 1000 km of Spa. The name DBR9 is derived from the original 24 Hours of Le Mans-winning DBR1 car, named for then-owner David Brown, which not only won the 24 Hour race in 1959 but also the World Sportscar title.
Model by IXO 1/43
2006 Aston Martin DBR9: Placing 4th in the GT1 class and 11th overall at the 1000 Km of Spa in 2006, were Peter Hardman, Christian Vann & Jamie Campbell-Walker in the second Team Modena car (Chassis #4). Up until 2008, the Aston Martin DBR9 was run by three factory teams and also sold to customers for private use in various racing series, such as the American Le Mans Series, Le Mans Series, FIA GT Championship, and FFSA GT Championship.
Model by IXO 1/43
2006 Aston Martin DBR9: Le Mans 2008, a 16th place finish and 4th in GT1 class, driven by Karl Wendlinger, Andrea Piccini, Heinz Harald Frentzen in 007 (Chassis #7). The other team car won the GT1 class at Le Mans in 2008, making the second consecutive year Aston Martin has won its class at the Sarthe circuit. For Gulf Oil it marked the 40th anniversary of their Le Mans win by a Gulf sponsored GT40.
Model by SPARK 1/43

2009 Aston Martin DBR1-2: A 4th place finish at Le Mans in 2009, for Jan Charouz, Tomas Enge and Stefan Mücke in what is also known as the Lola Aston Martin B09/60. Aston Martin's internal name for the car, DBR1-2, refers to the specific DBR1 chassis which won six races in 1959 en route to clinching the World Sportscar Championship as well as that year's 24 Hours of Le Mans. It uses the same racing prepared 6.0 L V12 engine from the Aston Martin DBR9 GT1 car. Competing in the Le Mans series, this car took first place overall.
Model by SPARK 1/43
2010 Lola-Aston Martin B09/60: Vanina Ickx, Maxime Martin and Bas Leinders took the Kronos Racing entry to 7th place overall and 7th in class at Le Mans in 2011. Ickx is the daughter of Le Mans great Jackie Ickx and has developed her father's driving talent. She co-drove this car in part of the 2010 Intercontinental Le Mans Cup for Kronos. This car is also known as the Aston Martin DBR1-2. With the lack of success with the AMR-One, Aston Martin reverted back to using the DBR1-2 in the later rounds of the Intercontinental Le Mans Cup and the American Le Mans series in 2011.
Model by SPARK 1/43
2011 Aston Martin DBR9S: The 24 Hours of Spa was part of the Blancpain Endurance Race series in 2011. It was the 67th runniung of this great event. Ecurie Ecosse entered this Aston in the team's return to racing after 25 years. Alasdair McCaig, Andrew Smith, Joe Twyman and Oliver Bryant drove the 6.0L V12 GT-3 Pro-Am class entry to 20th overall position, 9th in class. The evergreen DBR9S continues to be the only Aston Martin racing cars competing in international motorsports as of 2012, AMR having dropped their LMP1 racing projects.
Model by SPARK 1/43

2011 Aston Martin AMR-One : The AMR-One is the successor to the Lola-Aston Martin DBR1-2. This is one of three Le Mans Prototype sports car built by Prodrive for use by Aston Martin Racing. Driven by Stefan Mücke, Darren Turner and Christian Klien at Le Mans in 2011, the Gulf sponsored entry was withdrawn due to engine problems after 4 laps. The AMR-One was powered by a new 2.0L , turbo charged straigh-six in keeping with new Le Mans regulations. It suffered from insufficient testing. AMR abandoned the project in early 2012 with the Deltawing and Pescarolo 03 projects using the AMR-One chassis.
Model by PRODRIVE 1/43
2012 Aston Martin V8 Vantage GTE: Stefan Mücke, Adrian Fernández and Darren Turner drove this Aston Martin Racing entry at Le Mans in 2012. They finished 19th overall and 3rd in the LMGTE-Pro class. Powered by a 600 bhp, 4.3L V8 engine, the Vantage GTE is Aston Martin Racing's top of the range of purpose built race cars. Besides Le Mans, this car (Chassis GTE-001) was raced at Sebring, Spa, Silverstone and Fuji during the 2012 season. It was a successful return to GT racing for Aston, taking 7 podiums, 3 poles, 1 win, 2nd in World Endurance Championship.
Model by IXO 1/43
2013 Aston Martin V8 Vantage GTE: One of five Vantage GTE cars campaigned by Aston Martin Racing at Le Mans in 2013, to contest the LMGTE Pro category. This was the highest placed Aston, finishing in 18th place overall and 3rd in class, driven by Peter Dumbeck, Stefan Mucke and Darren Turner. Mucke and Turner drove the car in the rounds of the FIA Endurance Championship. The Vantage GTE was redesigned in 2012 from the former GT2 car. Modular construction allows the 4.5L V8 engine to be pulled straight out of the car, allowing engine changes to be completed in less than an hour without any effect on suspension settings. This car is Chassis #GTE-002.
Model by SPARK 1/43

Aston Martin Production Cars:

1951 Aston Martin D2 DHC : The DB2 was produced from 1950-53 and was powered by a 2.6L DOHC straight-six engine, which with Vantage performance upgrades, produced 125 hp. A total of 102 drop head coupes were made. The DB2 had racing success in its hardtop form, placing 1-2 in the 3-liter class at Le Mans in 1950.
Model by SPARK 1/43
1954 Aston Martin DB3S: Produced by Aston from 1953-1955, the DB3S was built primarily as a sports racing car. A total of twenty of the 31 cars (3.0L straight-six) produced were customer cars. Of the production run, five cars were made as aluminum bodied fixed head coupes covering the tubular space frame chassis.
Model by GAMA/PINKO 1/43
1956 Aston Martin DB2/4 MkII Notchback Coupe: At the London Motor Show in 1955, Aston Martin updated their 2+2 known as the DB2/4 into the Mark II. Only 34 'notchback' coupes were built and this car (Chassis AM300/1241) was delivered in November, 1956 to its original owner, Essex-based Ashtons Development Company. The car was special-ordered with non-polished aluminium castings, a wooden steering wheel and the striking two-tone colour combination of Ice Blue with a Peacock Blue hardtop and blue-grey interior. Both factory options and paint-colour combination are still present on the car. A total of 199 DB2/4 Mk II's were built, with the factory coachbuilt Notchbacks being the most desirable.
Model by MATRIX 1/43
1960 Aston Martin DB4: The DB4 was sold by Aston Martin from 1958 until 1963. It was an entirely different car from the DB3 it replaced. There were five "series" of DB4s, including the Vantage and Vantage GT models. Aston had introduced a 'Continental' touring car capable of 140 mph. It was also the first Aston Martin built at the Newport Pagnell works.
Model by VITESSE 1/43

1960 Aston Martin DB4: The 3.7 L dual overhead cam straight-6 engine of the DB4 produced 240 bhp and was externally visually related to the 2.9 L unit found in the DB3. It was however, a new engine design. The lightweight superleggera (tube-frame) body was designed by Touring and its Continental looks caused a sensation on its unveiling at the 1958 London Motor Show.
Model by VITESSE 1/43
1961 Aston Martin DB4 Zagato Barchetta: Forty years after the DB4 GTZ (Zagato), a DB4 chassis was shortened and Zagato built a pretty barchetta body for it, giving a look at what could have been had Zagato bodied DB4 production been continued. Powered by an aluminum 4.2L six-cylinder producing 350 bhp, this car is capable of 160 mph.
Model by JOLLY MODEL 1/43
1961 Aston Martin DB4 GTZ: Here in proper Aston Green, the DB4 GTZ (Zagato) coupe, was one of the best of David Brown's creations and one of the most beautiful coupes ever made. Desiged with racing in mind primarily, initially the factory had plans to produce 25 cars, but demand was not as strong as expected and production ceased at the 20th unit, making this the rarest of Aston production cars.
Model by ROAD SIGNATURE 1/18
1961 Aston Martin DB4 GTZ: The Zagato was created by sending a DB4GT chassis to the Zagato factory in Milan to be clothed in the most beautiful lightweight bodies ever designed. Given an even more powerful 3670 cc engine than the standard GT by using a higher ratio. This was able to produce a quoted 314bhp, with impressive performance with a top speed of 153mph.
Model by ROAD SIGNATURE 1/18

1963 Aston Martin DB5: The use of the DB5 in the James Bond movie Goldfinger, solidly place the DB5 as one of the most desirable cars in the world. Produced between 1963 and 1965, the DB5 was powered by a 4.0L six-clyinder engine, which could push the car to a maximum speed of 145 mph, with or without spy gear. One of the most iconic sports cars ever built.
Model by VITESSE 1/43
1964 Aston Martin DB5: Great lines, powered by a 4.0L, six-cylinder DOHC engine and three SU carburettors, producing 282 bhp, coupled with a with a new five-speed transmission, made the DB5 the ultimate British high performance sports car. The DB5 helped solidify Aston Martin's reputation as a premier luxury car maker.
Model by UNIVERSAL HOBBIES 1/43
1964 Aston Martin DB5: The DB5 is famous for being the first and most recognised James Bond car. It has been featured in several films, most notably Goldfinger, Thunderball, GoldenEye, Tomorrow Never Dies, and Casino Royale. Standard equipment on the DB5 included reclining seats, pile carpets, electric windows and a fire extinguisher. Machine guns, bullet shields, ejector seats and other spy gadgets were extra.
Model by CORGI 1/43

1980 Aston Martin AM V8 Coupe: From 1972, Aston's flagship model was the DBS V8, until 1972 when it became just the Aston Martin V8. From 1973 to 1989, there would be five series of the AM V8, this car being a Series 4 "Oscar India" specification car. Series 4 cars were built from 1978-85 and 352 units were built. Powered by a 5.3L V8 producing 310hp, the Series 4 cars were capable of 150 mph.
Model by PREMIUM X 1/43
1989 Aston Martin Virage: Produced between 1989-94, the Virage was the first new Aston in 20 years. Featuring a powerful 5.3L V8, producing 330 hp, it was intended as the company's top model. While the DB7 V12 ultimately had better performance, the Virage remained the exclusive, expensive, and hand-built king of Astons. It was replaced in 2000 with the Vanquish.
Model by UNKNOWN 1/40
1999 Aston Martin DB7 Vantage: Luxury in a fast wrapper. The V12 Vantage with its 6.0 litre, all-alloy engine, delivers 420 bhp, and Aston Martin claims it has a top speed of 186 mph. The car was engineered at Tom Walkinshaw Racing (TWR). The first V-12 Aston Martin produced, in 2002, a new variant was launched, named V12 GT with styling cues taken from the Jaguar XK8, its V12 engine produced 435 bhp and an exciting way to get groceries.
Model by AUTOART 1/43
2002 Aston Martin DB7 Zagato: The Aston Martin DB7 Zagato is a limited-edition grand tourer bodied by Zagato. Introduced at the Paris Motor Show in October, 2002, the Zagato was immediately sold out. Only 99 examples were sold to the public, though one extra was produced for the Aston Martin museum. Like the DB7 on which it is based, the Zagato is powered by a 6.0 L V12 engine and controlled via a 6-speed manual transmission. It has a top speed of 186 mph and a 0-60 mph acceleration time of 4.9 seconds
Model by IXO 1/43

2003 Aston Martin DB7 Volante: Produced from 1996-2004, the Volante was the convertible Aston Martin version of the Jaguar XKR. The DB7 was styled by Jaguar designers Ian Callum and Keith Helfet. With its supercharged V8 of 3.2L, which produces 335 hp, surprisingly the DB7 has a smaller engine and less hp than an XKR, but is more refined and luxurious, both traits you would expect in an Aston costing almost double the price of its sister Jaguar.
Model by VITESSE 1/43
2004 Aston Martin DB9: Replacing the Jaguar inspired DB7, the DB9 comes in two variants; coupé and ""Volante"" convertible, each producing 470 bhp from a 6.0L V12 engine and either 6-speed automatic or manual transmissions.. The DB9 has been adapted for use in sports car racing, running in the ACO and FIA's GT1 class. The DBR9 won in its debut at the 2005 12 Hours of Sebring, and has gone on to take many wins in FIA GT Championship, as well as the 24 Hours of Le Mans.
Model by MINICHAMPS 1/18
2005 Aston Martin V12 Vanquish S: Produced from 2001 to 2007, the Vanquish was the Aston Martin flagship during its production. The S was introduced in 2004 with its steering, suspension and brake modifications from the standard Vanquish. Powered by a 6.0L V12, producing 520 hp, the Vanquish S features a six-speed manual transmission.
Model by ALTAYA/IXO 1/43



To see other Racing Sports Cars click on years: 1945-59, 1960-69, CHAPARRAL, FORD GT40 & LOLA T70



PLEASE NOTE: From 1968 into the 1990's tobacco companies sponsored many significant race cars. In the interest of historical accuracy, Old Irish Racing chooses to display models in our collection as historically accurate as possible. While seeing a tobacco advert on a car gives me no more desire to go smoke than seeing a car makes me want to go suck on its exhaust pipe. If tobacco (or alcohol) adverts on race cars offend you, please go look at nice pictures of bunnies and kittens on another site.

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