When I was younger, cars with larger displacement engines and gobs of horsepower caught and held my attention. Now that I am older (and hopefully wiser) I have grown appreciation for cars that achieved maximum performance from small bore engines. The cars produced by Carlos Abarth & Co, have become an interest to me as both friends have owned and raced them, but also for the sheer engineering and development that went into Abarth cars whether Fiat, Simca or Porsche powered.

ABARTH - Sting of the Scorpion!

1950 Cisitalia-Abarth 204A Sport Spyder: Built by Cisitalia in 1948 (Chassis 04), the car was sold to Carlo Abarth who modified the tube framed racer, coaxing the 1.1L OHC aluminium engine engine to 80hp, which made it a formidible class contender. This was one of the last Cisitalia racers built before that firm's bankruptcy and one of the first Abarth cars (Abarth Chassis #08). The great Tazio Nuvolari drove the car at the Targa Florio but failed to finish due to a broken gearbox, but won the Palermo-Montepellegrino Hillclimb with this car, reputed to be his last win and his last race. The car spent most of its life in Argentina after that, but surfaced and was sold at auction in 2013 for $4.62 million!
Model by HANCHETTE 1/43
1956 Fiat Abarth 750 GT Zagato: To compete in the 750cc class of the Grand Touring Championship, Abarth commissioned Zagato to body the car and they created this beautiful double bubble shape. Dominating the 750 class, Abarth’s 747cc tuned engine produced 47 hp for this lightweight car, giving it a top speed of close to 100 mph.
Model by ABARTH COLLECTION 1/43

1960 Porsche-Abarth Carerra GTL: Herbert Linge and Heini (Hans-Joachim) Walter drove this car to 10th place overall and 1st in class at Le Mans in 1960. The Le Mans race at the start of the decade would be the catalyst for Porsche to move out of the small displacement classes and to take its place of prominence at the top of the racing grid and the first outright Le Mans win a decade later. Zagato designed and produced the lightweight bodies for the Porsche-Abarth Carerra GTL, one of the loveliest GT's of the era.
Model by STARTER 1/43
1960 Porsche-Abarth Carerra GTL: Abarth only built 21 of the Zagato designed cars on the Porsche 356B chassis, making this car one of the rarest Porsches. Using the 4-cam Carerra motor producing 140 hp., the cars had success in the under 2.0L class during the 1960-62 racing seasons. This car finished 7th OA and 1st in class at Le Mans in 1962, with Edgar Barth and Hans Hermann driving. It was the third consecutive class win for Porsche at Le Mans.
Model by METRO 1/43
1961 Fiat-Abath 850 S: New Zealanders Denis Hulme and Angus Hyslop drove this diminutive Abarth to 14th place overall and 1st in class at Le Mans in 1961. With Abarth tuning, this 1100 lb car produced 73 bhp and was capable of a top speed of 121 mph. Hulme was a relative unknown at the time of his drive for Abarth at Le Mans. Abarth had entered four cars hoping to contest for the Index of Performance and took third. The class win tweaked the nose of the French and the favored Panhard DB's.
Model by SPARK 1/43

1961 Fiat-Abarth 700S: Abarth built four 700S cars to conest Le Mans in 1961 and set their sights on winning the Index of Performance. Two coupes and a spyder were fielded by the works team, with this coupe driven by Paul Condriller and Karl Foitek just missing the finish with a engine failure due to a broken oil pipe on penultimate lap. Abarth while leading the Index of Performance early in the race, finished 3rd
Model by SPARK 1/43
1961 Fiat-Abarth 700S Spyder: The fourth of the 700S cars to contest Le Mans was the Scuderia Sernissima entry with Piero Frescobaldi and Raffaele Cammarota sharing the driving duties. Their car made it half way through the twenty-four hour race before suspension failure ended their race. The other Abarth 700S Spyder entry was taken out on the 16th lap by an accident at Arnage as it left the road.
Model by PINKO 1/43
1961 Fiat-Abarth 700S: Giorgio Bassi and Giancarlo Rigamonti drobve the second Abarth works coupe. Their race ended in the 13th hour when their generator packd it in. The 700S was a fiberglass bodied coupe or spyder mounted on a spaceframe chassis, in which the mid-mounted Fiat based 700cc twin-carburettor engine was mounted ahead of the five-speed gearbox. They produced a neat 64 bhp which made them fast enough, but they were too fragile for Le Mans.
Model by SPARK 1/43

1961 Fiat-Abarth 700S Spyder: Teodore Zeccoli and Jean Vinatier were teamed up to drive the Abarth factory 700S Spyder entry at Le Mans in 1961. One of three 700cc engined (64 bhp) cars entered by Abarth & Co. to contest for the Index of Performance. Vinatier left the road at Arnage on the 16th lap, injuring a course marshall. Zeccoli missed out on a drive at this years Le Mans, but would have better luck with Abarth at Le Sarthe in 1962.
Model by SPARK 1/43
1962 Fiat-Abarth 700S: The private entry of Frenchman Roger Masson at Le Mans in 1962 led the Index of Thermal Efficiency until its engine let go in the 17th hour. Masson co-drove with Italian Teodoro Zeccoli. At Le Mans in 1962, it was up to the private entries to bring success to Abarth, as the three factory cars all were out of the race by the sixth hour. Although Abarth would share the Index win with Lotus, 1962 was the final year for any Abarth works teams at Le Mans.
Model by SPARK 1/43
1962 Fiat-Abarth 1000 Bialboro: The results of Carlo Abarth's work were highly tuned engines, lightweight vehicle, and nimble handling. The cars dominated the smaller classes and often were quicker than the larger, more powerful competition in other classes. The engine from Abarth 1000 Bialbero was from a Fiat 600, fit with a DOHC producing 90hp. Abarth won win the 1962 Manufacturers Championship title for the 'up to 1000cc' Division I class. Abarth set the bar for small bore racing performance.
Model by ABARTH COLLECTION 1/43

1962 Fiat-Abarth 1000 Bialboro: Briggs Cunningham entered two Momo prepared cars in the GT 1.0 class for the Sebring 3-Hour race in 1962. Austin Healey Sprites formed stiff competiton, but the Cunningham cars finished 1-2, with Bruce McLaren driving this car to victory, Walt Hansgen in the sister car finishing second. They held off a hard charging Stirling Moss in a Sprite, Moss finishing 3rd in his last Sebring race.
Model by ABARTH COLLECTION 1/43 (modified)
1962 Abarth Simca 1300 Bialbero: Raced at Le Mans in 1962 by Claude Dubois and Georges Harris for Equipe Nationale Belge, they placed 14th overall and 1st in class. These little cars were powered by 1.3L DOHC Simca engines, which produced 125 bhp and made the cars capable of 140 mph. This car was also the joint winner of the Index of Thermal Efficiency.
Model by IXO 1/43
1962 Abarth Simca 1300 Bialbero: Gianni Balzarini and Franz Albert drove the Abarth Corse entry at Le Mans in 1962. Their race ended after 30 laps due to gearbox failure in the 4th hour. All three factory entries retired within the first six-hours. Abarth partnered on these cars with Simca, who made Fiats under license in France. It was Abarth's last factory appearance at Le Mans.
Model by SPARK 1/43
1963 Abarth 1000 Bialbero: This is an early model of a Fiat-Abarth 1000 Bialbero with the race number used at the Coppa F.I.S.A. race at Monza I 1963. The GT 1.15 class race was won by a driver simply known as 'Tiger'. Attempts to find out who Tiger was have not yet met with success.
Model by SOLIDO 1/43

1963 Fiat-Abarth 1000 Sport Spider: Carlo Abarth began his well-known association with Fiat in 1952, building the Abarth 1500 Biposto upon Fiat mechanicals. The 1000 S models were built to Group 6 (prototypes to 1000 cc) specifications. With a tube frame chassis and glass fibre body work, the 1.0L Fiat 600D twin-cam engine produced 105 bhp and was good for 137 mph. Entered in hillclimbs, sprints and endurances races, including Le Mans where it was entered but did not start in 1963.
Model by METRO ABARTH COLLECTION 1/43
1963 Fiat-Abarth 1000P: Using an Abarth twin cam 982cc engine with hemi-head, the 1000 GT Bialbero could produce 98 bhp, resulting in a top speed of 127 mph and was later uprated to 104 bhp. This car was entered at Le Mans in 1963 by Sarayac (Guy Flayac and was driven by Flayac and Lucien Barthe. Even though they placed 12th at the Le Mans test, the engine expired in the first hour, making this the second car out of the race.
Model by EXEM 1/43
1964 Fiat-Abarth 1300 OTC: Known as the Lufthansa Coupe, this one off Abarth was powered by a modified Fiat 1300cc DOHC engine. Campaigned by Scuderia Lufthansa, it was non-finisher at the 1965 Nurburgring 500km round of the World Sports Car Championship. In 1966 it finished 7th (4 in class) with Anton Fischaber and Hans Dechent driving.
Model by ABARTH COLLECTION 1/43

1964 Abarth-Simca 2000GT: Abarth began a relationship with the French Simca firm in 1963. Simca was partly owned by Fiat. Using a 2.0L Simca four-cylinder DOHC with twin-Webbers, the tuned engine produced 202 hp and made the small car capable of 168 mph. Contesting the 2.0L class, the 2000GT did quite well, although at Spa for the 500 Km race in 1964, Hans Herrmann did not finish the race driving this car due to brake problems. A sister car finished 16th, another retired to transmission failure.
Model by METRO (modified) 1/43
1965 Abarth 1000SP:
Model by METRO ABARTH COLLECTION 1/43
1965 Fiat Abarth 1000 Berlina/Corsa: The first 1000 Berlinas appeared in 1962 and used a version of the Fiat 600D engine. The Berlina Corsa was distinguished by its front mounted radiator that was placed upfront and in between the bumper bars. Its engine was tuned to produce 76 bhp helped the car reach 115 mph. Cooling was aided by permanetly opening the engine hood. These cars dominated their class in the International Touring Car Championship.
Model by HACHETTE 1/43

1965 Fiat Abarth OT 1300: Replacing the Abarth Simca 1300, it raced in the prototype class until homologated in May of 1966, winning the 1966 and 1967 World Championships for Abarth. Based on Simca parts, the OT 1300 used a twin overhead cam engine designed from the ground up, but was similar to the Simca 1.3-liter they had raced in previous years. It was built at Corso Marche and by Luciano Fochi who had already designed the 1.6 and 2.0-liter units.
Model by METRO 1/43
1965 Abarth 2000 OT Sport Spider: The 2000 OT Sport Spider was very successful in Group 4 racing, as well as in the European Hill Climb Championship in 1965. That year, Abarth had over 900 victories with their cars. The 2000 OT was produced in low numbers from 1964-67, but was homologated to run under FIA classifications. It was powered by a 2.0L twin-cam Fiat four-cylinder engine, with two Weber carbs, mated to a six-speed transmission. It produced 250 hp and had a top speed of 250 mph. Hans Herrmann drove this car to second place at the Trento-Bondone Hillclimb in 1965.
Model by METRO ABARTH COLLECTION 1/43
1967 1300 OT Periscopo: The Abarth 1300 OT was powered by a Simca 1.3L DOHC 4-cyl. engine and had a fiberglass body, which allowed the 147 bhp car to reach a top speed of 152 mph. These cars won the 1966 and 1967 Division 1 World Touring Car Championship for Abarth. At the Le Mans in 1967, a 1300 OTs was the last car to complete thr race, but won the class in 16th place overall. This car raced at the 1967 Nurburgring 1000 Km, where Erich Bitter and Willy Kauhsen drove the Abarth entry but failed to finish due to suspension failure.
Model by METRO ABARTH COLLECTION 1/43

1967 Abarth T140: Shown at the Turin Motorshow in 1967, this Abarth concept car was alledged to have a 610bhp, 6.0L V12 engine with four Webers! I am trying to do further research on this car for additional information.
Model by METRO ABARTH COLLECTION 1/43
1968 Fiat Abarth 2000 Sport Spyder: A two-litre Group 5 sports racer, Abarth’s Grp 5 car was built around a spaceframe with stressed sills. The four-cylinder mid-mounted engine used an Abarth alloy twin-cam cylinder head, two Weber carburetors, with an output of 250 bhp. It was more powerful than the Cosworth powered rivals such as Lola and Chevron.
Model by METRO 1/43
1969 Abarth 2000 S (SE 010): Helmut Leuze failed to qualify this 2.0L Martini sponsored car at the 1969 Norisring 200 Km. However, it finished 8th and 1st in class at the Targa Florio the month before and 8th overall and 1st in class on the Targa the following year. The Se10 was powered by a 2.0L DOHC four-cylinder emgine producing 240 bhp.
Model by METRO ABARTH COLLECTION 1/43

1970 Abarth 2000 SP: Abarth entered four cars for the Circuito del Mugello in 1970, which was driven on public roads, the race being five laps of a circuit just over 41 miles long (331 Km in total distance). Arturo Merzario finish 1st, with Leo Kinnunen finishing three seconds behind him and Gijs van Lennep finishing third in his Abarth. It was a clean sweep for Abarth in the last of these great road races. The 2000 SP was produced in different configurations from 1969-71. The SE 019 here was made in two configuration FB (Fuori Bordo, with the engine hanging out in the back) and MC (Motore Centrale, mid engined). Merzario and van Lennep used the FB configurationat Mugello, Kinnunen in one of the two mid-engined cars.. The Fiat four-cylinder, 2.0L engine produced 260 bhp.
Model by METRO ABARTH COLLECTION 1/43
1971 Abarth 2000 Spider SE021: The Abarth-Osella SE-021 was powered by a 2.0L 4-cylinder twin-cam engine developing a quoted 265bhp, and a top speed of 185 mph. Developed for the 1972 European 2-Litre Sports Car Championship series, at the Jarama 2-Hours Derek Bell and Nanni Galli brought home their SE-021s first and second in a remarkable demonstration of Abarth's capabilities at this ferociously hard-fought level.
Model by ABARTH COLLECTION 1/43
1971 Abarth 3000 Sport SE022: One of two cars built to contest Group 5, the 3.0L V8 powered 3000 delivered 376 hp and capable of 180 mph. It was driven by Johannes Ortner to the European Hillclimb Championship. Abarth was absorbed by Fiat in 1972 and the development and preparation of Abarth racing cars, including the 3000 SP, was undertaken at the shop of Enzo Osella in Turin.
Model by ABARTH COLLECTION 1/43
1972 Abarth 2000 Sport Spider SE021: Enzo Osella – the Abarth engineer who acquired the company, developed this potent sports racer to contest the 2.0L European Sportscar Championship. Arturo Merzario drove the works car to the makes and drivers championship in 1972, dominating the Chevrons and Lolas in its class. A powerful 2.0L DOHC twin-cam four-cylinder engine producing 265 bhp in a light monocoque chassis was a potent combination. In 1972, Merzario drove to victory at the Ricard, Dijon, Silverstone and Jarma circuits, with wins also garnered in sister cars by Derek Bell and Toine Hezemans.
Model by ABARTH COLLECTION 1/43

1973 Fiat-Abarth X1/9: The Fiat X1/9 is a mid-engined sports car designed by Bertone. It was built by Fiat from its introduction in 1972 and until 1982 when Bertone took over production. The Abarth X1/9 Prototipo used an 1840 cc engine with a custom 16v cylinder head fed by twin 44 mm Weber IDF carburettors. Abarth built this car as a prototype rally car to replace th Fiat-Abarth 124. Fiat based their next rally cars on the 131 platform instead and only five of these cars were built.
Model by METRO 1/43
1974 Fiat Abarth 2000 SP (SE027) : Between 1973 and 1974, Abarth-Oscella developed this 2.0L sports racing prototype with Pininfarina designed bodywork. It proved very promising with a 300 hp BMW M12 4-Cyl.engine, however, Fiat dropped the project citing the fuel crisis and a lack of internal resources. It is known to have raced once at the Salzburgring 200 mile race in 1976, where it finished 6th with Giorgio Piania driving.
Model by ABARTH COLLECTION 1/43
1977 Fiat 131 Abarth: The 131 Abarth was built to contest the World Rally Championship and Fiat won the title in 1977, 1978 & 1980 with these cars. Built to contest in Group 4, the 131 was also raced in the IMSA Championship (GTU) Powered by a Abarth tuned 2.0L engine, it produced 140 bhp. This car was driven by Beny Fernandez and Jose Luis Sala as co-pilot to victory at the 15th Rallye Catalunya, part of the Spanish Rally Championship. Its not clear if its a 'works' car, or if it is one of the 400 131 Stradale cars made for homologation, 50 of which were given to Abarth for competiton use.
Model by ALTAYA 1/43



To see other Racing Sports Cars click on years: 1945-59, 1970-Present and CHAPARRAL, FORD GT40 & LOLA T70



PLEASE NOTE: From 1968 into the 1990's tobacco companies sponsored many significant race cars. In the interest of historical accuracy, Old Irish Racing chooses to display models in our collection as historically accurate as possible. While seeing a tobacco advert on a car gives me no more desire to go smoke than seeing a car makes me want to go suck on its exhaust pipe. If tobacco (or alcohol) adverts on race cars offend you, please go look at nice pictures of bunnies and kittens on another site.

To continue to another section of the collection, select one of the following:

JAGUAR:
JAGUAR RACING CARS
JAGUAR PRODUCTION CARS

GREAT MARQUES:
ABARTH
ASTON MARTIN
ALFA ROMEO
AUSTIN HEALEY
BMW
CHAPARRAL
FORD GT40 & MKIV
FERRARI RACING SPORTS & PROTOTYPES
FERRARI FORMULA ONE
FERRARI PRODUCTION CARS
LOLA
LOTUS
McLAREN
MASERATI
MERCEDES W196 & 300SLR
PORSCHE RACING

GREAT RACING & AUTOMOTIVE LEGENDS:
THE GREAT GRAND PRIX, INDY & FORMULA 1 CARS 1900 - 1959
THE GREAT GRAND PRIX, INDY & FORMULA 1 CARS 1960 - Present
F1 WORLD DRIVER & CONSTRUCTORS CHAMPIONS 1950 - 1985
USRRC 1963 to 1968
CAN-AM SERIES 1966 - 1974
IMSA SERIES 1971 - 1998
TRANS-AM SERIES 1966 - 2013
GREAT RACING CARS 1945 to PRESENT
LAND SPEED RECORD CARS
GREAT SPORTS. GT & TOURING CARS 1948 - Present
PRE-WAR CARS, SPECIAL INTEREST & CLASSICS

DIORAMAS FOR SALE

THE TRIPLE CROWN OF ENDURANCE RACES:
THE 24 HOURS of LE MANS
THE 12 Hours of SEBRING
THE 24 HOURS of DAYTONA

DRIVER TRIBUTES:
THE LEGENDS OF RACING HALL OF FAME
JUAN MANUEL FANGIO TRIBUTE
STIRLING MOSS TRIBUTE

GREAT RACING TEAMS:
ECURIE ECOSSE
GULF OIL RACING
MARTINI RACING TEAM
GROUP 44, Inc.
CUNNINGHAM RACING TEAM
BRUMOS RACING TEAM

AIRCRAFT:
HISTORIC AIRCRAFT

WHAT'S NEW AT OLD IRISH RACING:
RECENT ADDITIONS TO THE COLLECTION

For copies of images, questions or comments about the collection to: OLD IRISH RACING

Back to: OLD IRISH RACING MODELS INDEX Home Page

Back to: OLD IRISH RACING Home Page

Member of International List of Scale Model Related Web Sites

Legal stuff: Content and images on this website are the property of Old Irish Racing and may not be used without permission. © Old Irish Racing 2016