Jaguar cars through the years have been some of the most fastest, most gorgeous production cars ever made. We have had the pleasure of owing some of the full scale versions of the models listed here. Enjoy your trip through our first of three Jaguar production car rooms. From sidecars to motorcars, SS Cars to SS Jaguar and then simply Jaguar, the Jaguar badge has been on some of the world's greatest cars now for over 75 years.
Grace, Space and Pace!


JAGUAR PRODUCTION CARS 1960 to 1968:

To view our complete Jaguar production car collection, take these links to the Jaguar production cars in production order, Cars to 1968 the Cars 1969-1987 and the Cars 1988 to present and Jaguar Concept Cars.


The Mk2 1959-1968
OLD IRISH RACING: A classic Mk2 sight, cornering on three wheels.
1967 Mk2 3.4 MOD: This is our Mk2, former North American Jaguar concours champion in its class.
Model by JAGUAR 1/1
1959-67 Mk2 3.8: This is probably the best mass produced Mk2 model ever made! It captures the lines, and details of the car perfectly.
Model by MODEL ICONS 1/18
1959-67 Mk2 2.4: This is a model of the famous Inspector Morse car from the television series based on the Colin Dexter novels. It was a 3.4 litre car, base police model. Guess the Inspector wasn't involved in many high speed chases.
Model by CORGI 1/43

1959-67 Mk2 2.4: Here are both versions of the Inspector Morse car I have of this car side by side. I watch the show from time to time just for the car.
Model by CORGI 1/43 and Tamiya 1/25
1959-67 Mk2 2.4: Inspector Morse was played by John Thaw in the series. The real car sold for over 100,000 pounds sterling after the series ended. This is a built plastic kit.
Model by TAMIYA 1/25
1959-67 Mk2 3.8: The Mk2 was produced from 1959-1967 and was the evolution of the 2.4 and 3.4 models first introduced in the mid-50's. Corgi has produced this car in many color variants.
Model by CORGI 1/43
1959-67 Mk2 3.8: By the end of its production run the Mk2 was a hard sell in the face of more modern looking and engineered cars. In 1960 however, it was the car to be seen in on the social scene. Ownership of the small Jaguar saloon (sedan) mean't you had arrived!
Model by CORGI 1/43

1959-67 Mk2 3.8: This Opalescent Metallic Blue is an actual Jaguar color and is stunning on the real car too!
Model by TAMIYA 1/25
1959-67 Mk2 3.8: The best color on a Mk2 is Carmine Red, but then I am biased see why by Clicking here
Model by CORGI 1/43
1959-67 Mk2 2.4: I picked up this plastic kit already built from a seller in England that claimed it has been improved by the individual wire wheels and lens on the lights, detailed interior. I have never seen a kit in this scale of the Mk2 by Revell (Cadet - UK), but it is similar to kits of other cars from the earlt 60's, fairly inexpensive when new, multi-piece bodies, no chrome parts, etc. This is a nice little gem!
Model by REVELL 1/40
1959-67 Mk2 3.8: By the mid-60's, the Mk2 and previous Mk1 had been in existence with its 50's styling for ten years. While still highly sought out as the "businessman's express" the Mk2 was beginning to lose sales to its stable mates the more modern S-Type and larger sedan the Mk X, as well as offerings from other European rivals. Had to imagine today, but within a couple years, Jaguar would find any buyers for the Mk2
Model by BOX 1/43

1959-67 Mk2 3.8: Darker colors on the Mk2 highlight the lines and the chrome trim on the cars to maximum effect. Jaguar made a very dark blue named Indigo and a lighter dark blue mettalic color named Opalescent Blue. This car comes close to the later and is a rare color for the Corgi Mk2.
Model by CORGI 1/43
1962 Mk2 County Estate: An idea and project started by Mike Hawthorn and Duncan Hamilton based on the original 3.4 saloon and styled by Roy Nockolds, Hamilton pushed for Sir William Lyons to make the car after Hawthorne's death in 1959. It was not till 1962 that Jaguar built an estate car based now on a Mk2 3.8 and bodied by Jones Brothers. When new, the car was used as a race support vehicle by Jaguar in Europe and later as a factory hack. Later sold, it was restored and converted to wire wheels in the 1970's.
Model by PROVENCE MOULAGE 1/43
1962 Mk2 County Estate: This is how the County was first built and used for race support in the early 60's. Jaguar did not have the capacity to build an estate wagon and was primarily focussed on the development of the XJ6 project, so it was never progressed beyond this concept and prototype. It would not be until 40 years later that Jaguar would finally introduce an estate wagon with the X-Type. This and other Jaguar estate car conversions built by coachbuilders which came later lead you to ponder what could have been...
Model by MATRIX 1/43

1959-67 Mk2 3.4: This is a 3.4L as the full size one one in our garage. In 1967, Jaguar had three small saloons (Mk2, S-Type, 420) competing for each other for sales, with the Mk2 being the least "modern" of the three. 1967 was the last production year for the Mk2, although the same body style would live on for a couple more years.
Model by VITESSE 1/43
1967 Mk2 3.4: Another replica of our car, complete down to the license plates. We now know that 719 3.4 lire cars were imported to the USA in 1967. This was done as a measure to provide cars for this important market in absence of the new 340 model being available. Only 10 340's were imported.
Model by TAMIYA 1/24
1967-68 340: In 1968 Jaguar gave the Mk2 a small make over and gave it besides slimmer bumpers from the S-Type, a more contemporary name. The cars were designated by their displacement (similar to Mercedes) and the 2.4L became the 240 and the 3.4L was now the 340. The 3.8L was dropped from the Mk2 variants in favor of its siblings. This example is in opalescent maroon, probably the absolute best Mk2/340 color, but I am biased having owned one in this color combination.
Model by VITESSE 1/43

1967-68 340: Some of the 3.4L Mk2's produced in 1967 were rebadged as 340's to bolster sales and move remaining stock. Details of these cars are on our website.
Model by VITESSE 1/43
1959-67 Mk2: Simply beautiful in black too! In the USA the 3.8L version was the only version of the Mk2 distributed by Jaguar until late in 1967 when a small number of 3.4L versions were brought in.
Model by BBURAGO 1/18
1967-68 240: The 2.4L version of the XK engine was continued in the 240, which like the 340 was offered after Mk2 production ended. This was the entry level Jaguar saloon.
Model by VITESSE 1/43

1960-63 Jaguar Mk2 "Coombes": John Coombes campaigned Mk2's in touring car racing before turning to the E-Type in 1962. A few customer cars were given the full "Coombes" treatment, which include triple SU's on the 3.8L six XK engine, upgraded brakes, no spats. Sporty!
Model by GEMS & COBWEBS
MK2 Wedding Cake ToppersThis model was to be on one of our wedding cake tops. It turned out to be too small. Su made the cake and I hastily assembled another model in three days before the wedding to go on top. Mk 2 Wedding Cake: Here is the finished example. The cake says "Drive through this world", which is a play on the Marc Cohen song Walk Through this World. The groom is leaning over, too much champagne?
Model by TAMIYA 1/25
1959-67 Mk2: The desire for open air motoring in a Mk2 led to the next best thing to a convertible, a sunroof. Steel sun roof cars from the factory are very rare and it was a very expensive option because it required a special Mk2 body shell. Dealer installed Webasto/Britax sunroofs like this are more common and opened up a great part of the roof to the sky.
Model by SMTS 1/43

1959-67 Mk2: With its 3.8 liter XK engine the Mk2 was the fastest production sedan in its time. The Police needed them to catch speeders and bad guys. They usually only got 2.4 litre versions however.
Model by MINICHAMPS 1/43
1959-67 Mk2: These truly are sports cars with four doors, high speed touring all day long! Grace, Space and Pace...
Model by MAISTO 1/18
1959-67 Mk2: Mk2 models come in all sizes and materials, this one in pewter I have many MK2 models in the collection. A visit to my web site reveals the reason why www.oldirish.com
Model by CRAFTSMAN STUDIO 1/43

1959-67 Mk2 3.4: This time the model material is compressed coal, unusual.
Model by UNKNOWN 1/43
1959-67 Mk2 3.8: This gold plated simulation on this model is in celebration of the Mk2's 40th Anniversary in 1999.
Model by CORGI 1/43
1959-67 Mk2 3.8: Here is a Mk2 in a polished metal finish, which gives it a chrome look.
Model by VANGUARDS 1/43

1960-On: Jaguar Buys Daimler
1959-61 Daimler SP250: Introduced at the New York Auto Show in 1959, where it was unofficially voted as the ugliest car at the show, the SP250 was Daimlers last production model before being purchased by Jaguar in 1960. Daimler had its followers and the SP250 was produced until 1964, but style wise, could not hold a candle to the E-Type or other Jaguar stable mates. The Edward Turner designed 2.5-litre Hemi-head V8 engine which powered the SP250 made 140bhp and speeds to 120 mph. Quirky looking at the time and ugly when compared to the E-Type, after almost sixty years, the looks of these cars has grown on me. Sibling rivalry with its Jaguar counter parts, which led to little development of the SP250, leaves one wondering what Jaguar could have done with it if they tried. The fact that there was little money for that kind of development makes it somewhat of a moot point.
Model by OXFORD 1/43
1960-68 Daimler Majestic Major: Jaguar purchased Daimler from BSA in 1960 for the increased production capacity it acquired. They also inherited Daimlers production models which provided some competition with Jaguar's own cars. However, Jaguar was smart enough to know that Daimler fit a niche in the market among brand loyal, wealthy patrons that Jaguar couldn't capture with its own models. What Jaguar didn't do however, was develop the Daimlers further, or utilize the Daimler hemi-head V8 Daimler for use in Jaguar cars. The 4.5L V8 in the Majestic Major produced 220bhp and was capable of taking the big car to a top speed of 123mph, faster than Jaguar's top of the line 3.8L six-cylinder equipped Mk X. They are also rivaled the Mk X in handling and driving comfort. The fact that the Daimler was priced 75% higher than the Jaguar assured that there were not too many sales lost and only 1,180 Majestic Majors were produced from 1960-1968 when all Jaguar and Daimler sedans were consolidated into the XJ6 and through badge engineering, Daimler became the upscale trim level for Jaguar production cars.
Model by NEO 1/43
1962-67 Daimler 2.5 V8: With Jaguar's purchase of Daimler in 1960, they inherited the sweet little 2.5L V8 engine they put into the Mk2 as Jaguar's first Daimler model. It would set the tone for the "up market" cars wearing the fluted grille and Daimler badging, classic here in stately Warwick gray.
Model by VITESSE 1/43

1960-1968: The E-Type is Born!
1961-64 E-Type FHC: This is the car shown at the Geneva Motor Show, when the E-Type was first introduced to the public. Fifty years later in 2011, the E-Type is still as stunning as it was back in 1961. Underneath the beautiful exterior is a monocoque hull with a tubular front sub-frame to carry the engine and front suspension--a layout which came from the Le Mans-winning D-Type, as well as the EA2 prototype. The E-Type is a prime example of racing improving the breed.
Model by IXO 1/43
1961-64 E-Type OTS: The introduction of the E-Type was a high water mark in automotive styling and design. Never had a production sports car ever possessed such evocative lines and created such envy among auto makers. The E-Type (XKE in the States) was a quantum leap from production sports cars with its triple carb 3.8 liter six producing 265 bhp, IRS, disc brakes, drop dead styling.
Model by VANGUARDS 1/43
1961-64 E-Type OTS: Stunning in any color, this one is a beautiful black open two seater. 2011 marked the 50th Anniversary of the E-Type - The Jaguar E-Type, 50 years young!
Model by CORGI 1/43
1961-64 E-Type FHC: The beginning of a new one, with the sensational new E-Type debuted in 1961. Its hard to imagine, but the crowds gathered to see the new model. Its hard to realize that the car made that kind of sensation over fifty years ago, but given the reaction of people seeing one today, its easy to understand why.
Model by BOX 1/43

1961-64 E-Type FHC: My personal favorite, nothing beats the pure lines of the fixed head coupe. The 3.8 cars were produced from 1961-1964 at which time the 4.2 litre version of the XK engine. A head turner and a real chick magnet!
Model by KYOSHO 1/43
1961-64 E-Type FHC: The E-Type's always stunning in red! I don't know if three wipers made the car go faster, it just always seemed to me it made sense on a car that certainly 'spoke' speed, even standing still.
Model by BOX 1/43
1961-64 E-Type OTS: A very early version based on the exterior hood latch strap, which I am not even sure made it on to production cars. In retrospect, these cars are now called Series 1 cars.
Model by BBurago 1/18

1961-64 E-Type OTS: The E-Type provided cross-continental touring, in a weather tight, comfortable cockpit. When the E-Type was launched at Geneva in 1961, it caused such a sensation that a second car was quickly dispatched to the motor show. Norman Dewis, a Jaguar test driver, used the cars 150 mph top speed often in spotty weather to make the 600 mile trip from Britain to Switzerland in 11 hours!
Model by BEST 1/43
1964-68 E-Type FHC: This is probably the nicest model of the E-Type coupe made in this scale. Powered by the 4.2L XK six-cylinder, while the bhp rating remained the same, the larger engined E-Types had more torque and got to 150 mph faster than the 3.8L models did. 1964 also saw the introduction of the all-synchro 4-speed gearbox.
Model by IXO 1/43
1966-68 E-Type 2+2 FHC: The 2+2 was a lengthened E-Type Coupe, which gave the range a model capable of carrying a small family. The two occassional seats in the rear gave the E-Type more versatility to more buyers. The longer body also meant that the E-Type could house an automatic transmission for the first time, a feature popular in the American market.
Model by SPARK 1/43

1968-71 E-Type OTS: The Shaguar, every collection needs at least one! This is Series 1 1/2 car, the designation given Series I cars with open headlights produced in 1967. All E-Types featured independent coil spring rear suspension with torsion bar front ends, and four wheel disc brakes, in-board at the rear, all were power-assisted.
Model by MATCHBOX 1/43
1968-71 E-Type OTS: In 1968 the E-type began to undergo changes, primarily in the introduction of mandated US safety changes. Gone were the glass headlamp covers, toggle switches on the dash and the it went from three carbs to two. The series of cars produced in 1968 is now referred to as the Series II cars.
Model by CORGI 1/43
1968-71 E-Type FHC: The Series 2 cars were the first E-Types to have air conditioning, which was a big plus for the closed coupes. They also featured better brakes than the earlier E-Types. Aside from the ommission of glass headlamp covers, Series 2 cars had a wider front air intake, higher front bumper bar and turn lamps mounted below the bumper.
Model by SPARK 1/43

1960's Jaguar Saloons
1961-64 Mark X: Cyril has just acquired this Mk X (Mark 10)for restoration. The Mk X sat alongside the new E-type at its introduction at the Geneva show in 1961, replacing the Mk IX saloon. The Mk X was a big car by European standards. The early cars were powered by the XK 3.8L six-cylinder engine and were capable of 120 mph.
Model by CORGI 1/43
1961-64 Mark X
Model by NEO 1/43
1961-64 Mark X: The BIG Jaguar Saloon, the MkX was designed with the American market in mind, but buyers there did not like the fact that it was not more traditional British in its styling. In 1964 the Mk X was upgraded to the new 4.2L XK six-cyl. engine,the big car being surprisingly fast, but what else do you expect from Jaguar? This model features the characters from an episode of the cartoon Tin-Tin.
Model by HERGE 1/43
1963-68 3.4S (S-Type): Jaguar saw the opportunity to position a larger, more luxurious version of the Mk2 between that car and the large Mark X in the saloon car range. Powered by either a 3.4L or 3.8L DOHC six, the S-Type as it was known provided more interior and boot space than the Mk2. Not as sporty as a MK2, it was a better riding and handling car due to its IRS, which came from the E-Type and Mark X.
Model by ATLAS 1/43

1963-68 3.8S (S-Type): The 3.8S was the only version available in the USA, with automatic transmission as the standard, although a 4-speed manual with overdrive was available. Styling was always controversial, using a refined Mk2 front, flatter roof and Mark X rear-end for a more 'contemporary' look. The S-Type outsold the Mk2 in 1965 and 1965,
Model by NEO 1/43
1965 S-Type 3.8: The Old Irish Racing 3.8S (S-Type) in Cotswold Blue. This is a low mileage original car which has spent almost its entire life in British Columbia, Canada. A sympathetic restoration was done in 2012, preserving all original mechanical components and most of the interior.
Model by Jaguar 1/1
1966-68 420: The 420 was the final development of Jaguar's small sporting saloon range. With the new 4.2L six (245 bhp), IRS, rack and pinion steering, this was the ultimate of the small saloons in handling and performance. The 420 hinted at what was to come and production ended with the introduction of the XJ6 in 1968.
Model by NEO 1/43
The Jaguar Saloons: The Mk2, the S-Type and the 420. From the Mk2 came the S-Type, which in turn evolved into the 420. At the end of model production in 1968, all three models were available to Jaguar buyers choice of 3.4L, 3.8L and 4.2L saloons. Jaguar saloons were consolidated into the new, contemporary XJ6.

To view our complete Jaguar production car collection, take these links to the Jaguar production cars in production order, Cars to 1968 the Cars 1969-1987 and the Cars 1988 to present and Jaguar Concept Cars.




To continue to another section of the collection, select one of the following:

JAGUAR RACING CARS:
1950's
1960 - 70's
1980's
1990's - PRESENT
JAGUAR AT LE MANS

JAGUAR PRODUCTION CARS:
PRE-WAR to 1959
1960 to 1968
1969-1987
1988 - PRESENT
JAGUAR CONCEPT CARS
EACH JAGUAR FROM 1935 IN PRODUCTION ORDER

FERRARI RACING CARS:
1949 - 1959
1960 - 1969
1970 - 1979
1980 - PRESENT
FERRARI FORMULA ONE - ALL YEARS
FERRARI PRODUCTION CARS - ALL YEARS

PORSCHE RACING CARS:
1950's & 60's
1970's
1980 - ON

GRAND PRIX, INDY & FORMULA 1:
1900 - 1959
1960 - 1969
1970 - PRESENT

THE TRIPLE CROWN OF ENDURANCE RACES:
THE 24 HOURS of LE MANS
THE 12 Hours of SEBRING
THE 24 HOURS of DAYTONA

GREAT AUTOMOTIVE MAKES:
ABARTH
ASTON MARTIN - RACING & PRODUCTION
ALFA ROMEO - RACING & PRODUCTION
AUSTIN HEALEY - RACING & PRODUCTION
BMW -RACING & PRODUCTION
CHAPARRAL
FORD GT40, MkIV & MIRAGE
LOLA
LOTUS - RACING & PRODUCTION
McLAREN
MASERATI - RACING & PRODUCTION
MERCEDES W196 & 300SLR

RACING & RALLYE CARS
RACING SPORTS, GT & PROTOTYPE CARS 1945 to 1959
RACING SPORTS, GT & PROTOTYPE CARS 1960 to 1969
RACING SPORTS, GT & PROTOTYPE CARS 1970 to PRESENT
LAND SPEED RECORD CARS
RACING SUPPORT VEHICLES AND TRANSPORTERS

SPORTS, GT, TOURING & CLASSIC CARS
PRODUCTION SPORTS. GT & TOURING CARS 1948 - Present
CLASSIC & SPECIAL INTEREST RACING & PRODUCTION CARS & TRUCKS

DRIVER TRIBUTES:
THE OLD IRISH RACING HALL OF FAME
JUAN MANUEL FANGIO TRIBUTE
STIRLING MOSS TRIBUTE
DAN GURNEY TRIBUTE
JIM CLARK TRIBUTE
WORLD DRIVER & CONSTRUCTORS CHAMPIONS 1950 - 1985

GREAT RACING TEAMS:
ECURIE ECOSSE
GULF OIL RACING
MARTINI RACING TEAM
GROUP 44, Inc.
CUNNINGHAM RACING TEAM
BRUMOS RACING TEAM

GREAT NORTH AMERICAN RACING SERIES:
USRRC 1963 to 1968
CAN-AM SERIES 1966 - 1974
IMSA SERIES 1971 - 1998
TRANS-AM SERIES 1966 - 2013

RACING DIORAMAS

OLD IRISH AIR FORCE:
HISTORIC AIRCRAFT

For copies of images, questions or comments about the collection to: OLD IRISH RACING

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Legal stuff: Content and images on this website are the property of Old Irish Racing and may not be used without permission. Old Irish Racing 2018

PLEASE NOTE: From 1968 into the 1990's tobacco companies sponsored many significant race cars. In the interest of historical accuracy, Old Irish Racing chooses to display models in our collection as historically accurate as possible. While seeing a tobacco advert on a car gives me no more desire to go smoke than seeing a car makes me want to go suck on its exhaust pipe. If tobacco (or alcohol) adverts on race cars offend you, please go look at nice pictures of bunnies and kittens on another site.